The Challenges and Benefits of Home-Schooling
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163 posts in this topic

ID:1   Posted (edited)

From an earlier discussion:

 

Quote

In 2011, he and colleague Gina Riley surveyed 232 parents who unschool their children, which they defined as not following any curriculum, instead letting the children take charge of their own education. The respondents were overwhelmingly positive about their unschooling experience, saying it improved their children’s general well-being as well as their learning, and also enhanced family harmony. Their challenges primarily stemmed from feeling a need to defend their practices to family and friends, and overcoming their own deeply ingrained ways of thinking about education. (The results are discussed at length here.)

 

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/09/02/how-do-unschoolers-turn-out/

 

I find this interesting. WHY, is there such an overwhelming need to defend the idea of homschooling ?

 

Wouldn't it be easier to defend this decision the same as Jehovah does - let the action speak rather than argue.

 

If you have family that is asking "WHY?! and you want to answer - could one simply say, "Well, bring your child over to our house and lets put the methods of education to the test."

 

We'll give them both the latest "Oral Review" from the KM and see how they do. Or something like that? In fact, were you to suggest the test - WHAT would be a good test?? I suggested the Oral Review - what else might be a good trial - something one might encounter in the ministry or at work or give them a bank statement and ask them to "balance it"?

 

What do you think - on either point. The need to defend - and what would be a good "proof"?

 
Edited by trottigy
Ilda Porter and ADELITA like this

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Well I got taken to court about homeschooling my children and the court ruled that since I didn't go to college to be a teacher then I didn't qualify to teach my children at home. 

 

When I started High School I was in all the honorary classes and I went to college and High School at the same time. My goal was to go to UC Davis and become a vetrinarian and since it takes approx. 10yrs I wanted to get a head start. 

 

Due to circumstances my college fund was spent by my step-mother and I was thrown out of the house the year I graduated from High School. 

 

Therefore I married an older man that turned out to be gay and we went through a nasty divorce. My children were reading by the time they were 3 and 4yrs old and had Bible reading parts on the school before they turned 5yrs old. I made my own reading books when they were between 2 and 3. 

 

So even though my kids were still elementary school age, I was not qualified to homeschool them from the court's perspective. 

 

When my kids went back to public school they were so far ahead of the class that the teachers used them as aids. They didn't learn a thing in public school. 

 

Also my worldly parents were against me saying that my children wouldn't be socialized properly, etc. So I had my own family against me. 

 

I used to be defensive because of what I went through but now of course my kids are adults, I have seen both sides of the coin. 

 

I have seen really good parents teach their children and I have seen ones just leave it up to the child to finish their books and of course the child doesn't finish the required curriculum. But that happens in public school too and really each time it comes down to the parents involvement. 

 

I think the parent that is involved with their children are most likely to be on the defensive because they are putting in the time, energy and mental preparation that it takes and they see the results compared to their children's peers. 

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Well I got taken to court about homeschooling my children and the court ruled that since I didn't go to college to be a teacher then I didn't qualify to teach my children at home. 

 

When I started High School I was in all the honorary classes and I went to college and High School at the same time. My goal was to go to UC Davis and become a vetrinarian and since it takes approx. 10yrs I wanted to get a head start. 

 

Due to circumstances my college fund was spent by my step-mother and I was thrown out of the house the year I graduated from High School. 

 

Therefore I married an older man that turned out to be gay and we went through a nasty divorce. My children were reading by the time they were 3 and 4yrs old and had Bible reading parts on the school before they turned 5yrs old. I made my own reading books when they were between 2 and 3. 

 

So even though my kids were still elementary school age, I was not qualified to homeschool them from the court's perspective. 

 

When my kids went back to public school they were so far ahead of the class that the teachers used them as aids. They didn't learn a thing in public school. 

 

Also my worldly parents were against me saying that my children wouldn't be socialized properly, etc. So I had my own family against me. 

 

I used to be defensive because of what I went through but now of course my kids are adults, I have seen both sides of the coin. 

 

I have seen really good parents teach their children and I have seen ones just leave it up to the child to finish their books and of course the child doesn't finish the required curriculum. But that happens in public school too and really each time it comes down to the parents involvement. 

 

I think the parent that is involved with their children are most likely to be on the defensive because they are putting in the time, energy and mental preparation that it takes and they see the results compared to their children's peers.

Yikes! How long ago was that. Thankfully now it has become much easier (even hard states like Ny).

trottigy and Alex_Mikella like this

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Yikes! How long ago was that. Thankfully now it has become much easier (even hard states like Ny).

 

This was in the early 90's. But the problem too was that apostate literature was presented in the court to make me look very bad. So I had many things going against me, it was a 5yr battle. 

PrairieGirl likes this

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All someone needs to justify home schooling is showing someone the "new" form of math they are trying to teach kids in school these days. 

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ID:6   Posted (edited)

Well I got taken to court about homeschooling my children and the court ruled that since I didn't go to college to be a teacher then I didn't qualify to teach my children at home. 

 

When I started High School I was in all the honorary classes and I went to college and High School at the same time. My goal was to go to UC Davis and become a vetrinarian and since it takes approx. 10yrs I wanted to get a head start. 

 

Due to circumstances my college fund was spent by my step-mother and I was thrown out of the house the year I graduated from High School. 

 

Therefore I married an older man that turned out to be gay and we went through a nasty divorce. My children were reading by the time they were 3 and 4yrs old and had Bible reading parts on the school before they turned 5yrs old. I made my own reading books when they were between 2 and 3. 

 

So even though my kids were still elementary school age, I was not qualified to homeschool them from the court's perspective. 

 

When my kids went back to public school they were so far ahead of the class that the teachers used them as aids. They didn't learn a thing in public school. 

 

Also my worldly parents were against me saying that my children wouldn't be socialized properly, etc. So I had my own family against me. 

 

I used to be defensive because of what I went through but now of course my kids are adults, I have seen both sides of the coin. 

 

I have seen really good parents teach their children and I have seen ones just leave it up to the child to finish their books and of course the child doesn't finish the required curriculum. But that happens in public school too and really each time it comes down to the parents involvement. 

 

I think the parent that is involved with their children are most likely to be on the defensive because they are putting in the time, energy and mental preparation that it takes and they see the results compared to their children's peers. 

I can't believe you were court ordered to put your children back into public school. My heart goes out to you.

 
Edited by kejedo
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ID:7   Posted (edited)

In the 1840s, 55 percent of 5 to 15 years olds attended school. Obviously, not everyone accepted schooling out side of the home, and schools may have been on the defensive to get the other 45 percent involved.

 

Nice pic of an Oklahoma school room here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_education_in_the_United_States

 

Now, many of homeschool families are put on the defensive due to criticism by people who have not looked into the subject, or could not possibly fathom what flies in school these days.  

 
Edited by kejedo
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When they keep the bullies in the school system pleading their case that their home situation is causing the bullying and the victims have to be pulled from the school system for self preservation ... there often no other choice but to homeschool because they become so traumatised.

bobby, kejedo and bagwell1987 like this

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:blink: Then there's the very disturbing and nasty business of allowing trans boys and girls to use the restroom of their choice. :upsidedown:

I suppose in homeschooling, the boy and girl would all use the same bathroom :)

:lol1:

Ilda Porter and Old like this

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Difference there being though, is that the toilet blocks in most schools have multi stalls, homeschooling usually only one person at a time ... at school the gap between what is normal and what is not normal is becoming more in your face. While I do advocate public schooling for socialising and see merit in some secular schooling at least at some stages through a child's schoolife, I can certainly see why parents both witnesses and non witnesses are increasingly pulling their children from the school system or not even allowing them to be integrated in the first place.

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When they keep the bullies in the school system pleading their case that their home situation is causing the bullying and the victims have to be pulled from the school system for self preservation ... there often no other choice but to homeschool because they become so traumatised.

Bullies are supposed to be taken out of class. HaHa, like that works. I had one young lady sent to my high school completion class because she had a fight with another girl (not on school grounds). She finished her work with me and graduated. I recently saw her and her mother, together and then separately. The student ran up and hugged me. Later, her mother told me, "She thinks the world of you." The student thought that she would like to be an attorney, because she was quite adversarial a couple of years back, and has taken some college classes. Now her personality has mellowed and she loves (and always has loved) spending time planting. She is an expert on all kinds of plants, their growth patterns, nutrients, parasites - you name it. She may be pursuing work in that area. It is ironic that school counselors do not encourage students to consider the field that they already love rather than push for college. 

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p.s. I'm all for home schooling if the parent actually cares about the education their child receives, and has the time to teach them. I see how witnesses would be superior in this field because they love their children, usually have work schedules which can lend itself nicely and they can blend theocratic material in as well.

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So, I was thinking about "the test" - how about giving both the test for citizenship?

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So, I was thinking about "the test" - how about giving both the test for citizenship?

 

But then that's not "Constitutional"   :D

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So, I was thinking about "the test" - how about giving both the test for citizenship?

 

What is the test for citizenship? Like when a foreigner comes into the country and wants to be legal?

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From the 100 questions for  US citizenship: Question 48 re who can vote includes this correct answer- "A male citizen of any race can vote." 

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Jerry its simple the teachers don't get  payed if the child dose not show up for school

and most not all but 99% only care about that and not about what is best for the child

a few years a go all the Teacher hear in Calif tried to make it illegal to homeschool a child

the biggest reason they gave was there school were losing money

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Yes, if you read through them all, a few seem odd or contradictory. For the same question, 48, one could also say "any citizen" and be 'passed' as correct on that question.  

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ID:23   Posted (edited)

Kids in a public school SHOULD be able to get an 80% at LEAST!

Wouldn't it be great to test them against the homeschooled. Give both groups an hour and see how they do.

 
Edited by trottigy

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Kids in a public school SHOULD be able to get an 80% at LEAST!

Wouldn't it be great to test them against the homeschooled. Give both groups an hour and see how they do.

I could barely pass this with an 80, because I don't know the names of the congresspersons from my state and I could not honestly answer questions that use 'we' and 'us.'

Mom2Savannah and PrairieGirl like this

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