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trottigy

The Challenges and Benefits of Home-Schooling

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Do people really talk to this way face to face in their own congregations?  Boy I hope not it would be unkind.  

 

Instead of finding ways to encourage and supporting one another we choose to be rude and condescending.    I will not allow myself to "fight" and  "defend" my PERSONAL choices anymore.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MY tuppence: Unschooling is a specific philosophy of some homeschoolers, not all. Common core is a very different subject.  There is, in fact, a typical curriculum per grade level, and there are already testing standards that define into which grade level one's performance falls (in each of five academic subjects. ) Do we have a thread on that?

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8 hours ago, Alexa said:

 

The title needs to be redeemed by someone... 

 

I am not sure what this means, but I happily renamed the title as it seemed offense to some.

 

I do regularly talk with people in my congregation, but I have never had a person in the hall say to me, "Do you talk that way to others? Its so unkind." :eek: 

 

I am not seeing anything here in this thread that would cause that type of a reaction. I think as brothers and sisters we can talk openly and ask questions, but I don't feel we should have to walk on egg shells as it were and only shower praise on people. That's not real communication is it?

 

I know when I was in school I had to deal with all types of communication. It was good preparation for life as an adult and the same type of discussions that are had at work. I hope we can continue to talk openly in the future. :grouphug: 

2 minutes ago, kejedo said:

MY tuppence: Unschooling is a specific philosophy of some homeschoolers, not all. Common core is a very different subject.  There is, in fact, a typical curriculum per grade level, and there are already testing standards that define into which grade level one's performance falls (in each of five academic subjects. ) Do we have a thread on that?

 

No, but it sounds like it would make for an interesting discussion.

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p.s  IN Maine a certified teacher has to review the work of the student and write a report. I have a criteria that I cover in my evaluation letter. A sister once asked me to just write "Progress has been made," and sign it without offering any info of what her girls had done that year. Unfortunately she got ticked off at me when I wanted to ask her some questions, and repeated: "Just write 'progress has been made.'"  I did not write her school review letter, but we are still friends.

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The new thread title no longer seems to fit the topic I thought I was replying to. 

 

Just what is "unschooling"? Is it like "unlearning"?

 

How about something simpler, like home school vs public school? 


  Edited by Qapla

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20 minutes ago, Qapla said:

The new thread title no longer seems to fit the topic I thought I was replying to. 

 

Just what is "unschooling"? Is it like "unlearning"?

 

How about something simpler, like home school vs public school? 

 

Better?

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Nice thread title change !!

 

 

From my experience there will be challenges and benefits to both.I think that most of us have our own opinions bases on preference arrived at by our own research. There is plenty of research with pros and cons for both methods of instruction.

The rest is opinion, but we can also learn much from each others opinion. It gives a perspective of ideas that are out there. Especially ideas of our brothers and sisters on a forum with a large scope.

 

There is one caveat to homeschooling that is often overlooked by homeschooling parents. This is the situation where the child may have  a learning disability that is not easily evident to the parent. A trained teacher may pick it out through the regular assessments. (We have to give credit to trained teachers). Sometimes when the  teacher and school recognize a certain learning disability   recommendations are made and the child gets assessed by the school child psychologist. As a result an IEP (individualized education plan) is drafted. The IEP identifies issue and solutions in the form of modifications to help the child reach educational goals successfully.

 

I will relate my own experience with my firstborn, the grade 1 teacher picked up on a certain learning deficiency that was completely overlooked my my husband and I. I can tell you that we were very attentive parents. We taught him a great deal. He could read, had a great vocabulary and  by age 5 he could carry on a conversation on the existence of God. I mention this to show that we really did our best but we still missed something.

 

After a school assessment and an IEP,  we learned how his little brain was wired and the school gave us the tools to help him at home while modifications were being utilized at school. As he got older he was able to use these strategies to carry himself through the higher grades through university and recently got a honors degree.   Of course we did our share of homeschooling to help him along the way.  Had I chosen to homeschool  exclusively, my son would have struggled. 

 

This is my personal experience and by no means indicates that home school children may have learning disabilities. But it can happen an,d if it does  a homeschool teachers with little educational training needs to ask themselves: do I have the tools and expertise to recognize a learning disability?

 

I read that the reason for this homeschool forum was to help some who are on the "fence" decide. I am adding my thoughts because the more information at one's disposal , the better the decision will be.

 

 

 

 


  Edited by alba aurora

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On 2/4/2016 at 3:25 AM, trottigy said:

 

I am not sure what this means, but I happily renamed the title as it seemed offense to some.

 

I do regularly talk with people in my congregation, but I have never had a person in the hall say to me, "Do you talk that way to others? Its so unkind." :eek: 

 

I am not seeing anything here in this thread that would cause that type of a reaction. I think as brothers and sisters we can talk openly and ask questions, but I don't feel we should have to walk on egg shells as it were and only shower praise on people. That's not real communication is it?

 

I know when I was in school I had to deal with all types of communication. It was good preparation for life as an adult and the same type of discussions that are had at work. I hope we can continue to talk openly in the future. :grouphug: 

 

No, but it sounds like it would make for an interesting discussion.

No... I think it was still in the students...

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Dear Sister Alba, Congratulations on the successful  results with your son. Is he Our Brother, also?

Yes, he's been baptized since he was 15 and he's  22 this year and very active in the congregation. As most christian parents, we are proud of his christian progress first and foremost.  Thanks for asking

 
 

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A rather anecdotal experience regarding my first son's entrance to Kindergarten:  The schools gave a preliminary (entrance) exam the spring before grade -K in our school district.  My son Keith had been reading for years by then. After his test, the teacher who administered the exam told me she was quite surprised that he was far advanced in the assessment, but did not know when he celebrated his own Birthday.  It presented a small opportunity to witness, and I assured her that if asked his 'Date of birth,' he would answer it correctly.  My next two sons had the same Kindergarten pre-test, but not the same experience. 

 

Although each of my sons had been fluent readers before KIndergarten, they were made to stop reading books and to re-learn reading, phonetically (only). They still read Bibles passages and books at home. My youngest son even wrote books and designed book covers since he was three.  They also were taught correct spelling at home, but their school was using "automatic spelling," so they used correct spelling at home and inventive spelling at school. My youngest son stopped writing books when he started school.

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Some States have great support for home schooled kids, and offer a variety of classes and all kinds of resources. We took advantage of the 'No Child Left Behind' policy and were grateful for the support from the public school system. We have nothing against teachers and have a lot of respect for educators. We are always doubting ourselves and feel that we could be doing more, even though it seems we're doing all we can. To be honest, we would love it if there were better options, at least, since we've moved to New York we do. Washington State was homeschool heaven compared to here. It was unbelievable the resources they offered for home schooled kids. So, when you talk about parents that home school their kids, you can't speak in generalities. There is no one size fits all. Each State is different, and each parent goes about home schooling in a way they feel is best for their child.

But when I catch my 15 year old son watching (theocratic) videos (when he's supposed to be homeschooling), or singing Kingdom songs (he has half of them memorized), I just smile. My inadequacies don't matter, because he's happy and is free to explore his love for Jehovah. 

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I've just now come to this thread and haven't read all the posts, but since the subject includes benefits of home-schooling, I thought it might be the place to post this.

 

I was reading the daily e-mail announcements from the high school where I work and I thought this one in particular was quite telling:

 

"Edgewood is having its first Kindness Week starting on Monday, Feb 22nd – Friday Feb 29th. This week is dedicated to promoting acceptance, respect, and awareness. We will be supporting self-confidence, LGBT pride, Feminism, and culture. So please join us in next week’s spirit week. See an ASB member if you have any questions."

 

Besides all the other obstacles, snares and pitfalls associated with the public school system, in regards to bad association, now the school administration is promoting and supporting, not tolerance as in the past, but acceptance of LGBT pride among teenagers. In fact, there's a LGBT club on campus that sets up a table display during this week at lunch to promote its acceptance. This club has also made t-shirts that have an LGBT pride statement on the front and some teachers, including heterosexuals, wear them in the classroom and around campus to show their support.

 

One day recently, I noticed two girls talking to each other at lunch while a small group of boys not far away were snickering at them, and I didn't know why. As I got closer and heard the girls talking, it was obvious that the one who was much bigger and taller and wearing a dress, high heels, bra etc. was actually a boy, whom I assume is in the process of becoming a girl, but still had a deep voice. I've seen the same thing on campus in reverse with girls trying their best to be boys. While we see this in the world among adults, it's just one more thing that is being thrust upon teenagers at the high school level that Witness kids have to contend with at a time when they may be dealing with their own sexual identity  and trying to adhere to Jehovah's standards of morality.

 

 


  Edited by minister159

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For some time it has been an understood policy (in many school districts) that job preference would be given to Homo or Transsexual persons, under the mission statements  of accepting diversity.  I've seen plenty in school hiring practices.

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oh my it's not about the disagreeing in my opinion, but about the forming opinions out of ignorance. 

 

Embrace common core... um no.. never. If it really was about having every one learn GOOD things and the same GOOD things, that would be different. In my state a LOT of it is about embracing that homosexuality, as well as transgender. Figuring out if your brain says you are a girl or a boy, no matter what your genitals say. (yes they sent elementary school children home with a gingerbread man, and said to put what ever genitals in the genital area, and then to write in the brain area what gender they felt they were even though there was different genitals... yes this was ELEMENTARY age children.

 

Math, common core... that's a joke, in REAL life, you need to know what the REAL answer is. Not well if you did it this way and even though you got the answer wrong you are right because you did it how they said, but if you didn't do it how they said and you got the answer right, you are wrong. That will make no sense when they have to pay rent, and groceries... well they did it right, so now you should just take the money they hand you even if it's wrong amount? 

 

Also about disabilities, I actually know many many children who are homeschooled with them. With parents being with them all the time, most do know their children have them or not. There is other ways of having them evaluated... there are drs, and such. Sadly I have a niece and nephew, main streamed in public school their whole life, NOT special ed, they are in high school and can't tell time or write their own names, but they are on the honor roll! And main streamed classes. They are being passed on cause they make the school a lot of money. I have no idea why they would be main streamed, doing "regular" work, being on the honor roll in high school and can't spell their own names... or tell time... or even read the temperature on the wall. My 9 year old has been able to tell me what the temperature is in our house since she was at least 5... I asked the 17 year old niece to look and tell me and she just stared at my blankly, and said it has numbers??? Yeah. I'm not too impressed with their education. 

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BTW, saying a broad statement that MOST parents are not involved with their children who homeschool, is again ignorant. I don't know any one like that at all. It would actually be the opposite, or Jesus parable would be meaningless. All fathers/mothers love their children... and most try to do their best for their children. YES, the majority of parents, are going to love and care for their children MORE then strangers at a school. I know it's shocking. But, Jesus didn't use parables of how a school teacher would love a child so much they would do xyz for them. He actually used the parable that a father would love their children, a mother would gather them. Not a school teacher would gather then to them. Yes, most parents love and care for their children. More then school teachers... it's shocking how people have been brainwashed to think that "officials" are better qualified to care for children then parents.  But, this line of thinking would make us as witnesses obsolete. MOST religions also believe to be a minister you must go to higher schooling, like college. Funny thing is, MOST while in college to be ministers lose their faith in God from the schooling! I know my brother in law, originally went to college to become a pastor... and that is exactly what happened. He lost all faith in God, based on the classes he had to take to become a pastor! And then after that happened to him, we read the stats that this is not uncommon. But, I guess us witnesses are not qualified to be ministers because we didn't go to college to become ministers either. That's how it reads. When people say these things. It's just something to think about. 

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A little OT, but also anecdotal: I had a man in his 30s trying to prepare for the (then) GED. HIs math skills were below 5th grade, he was collecting disability and working off the books as a cook. He also was taking a course through his pastor. After 2 years of paying his pastor, he would receive a Masters Degree of Theology. The he could start his own church and collect tithes. Many of these local churches have spun off in such a manner. So, in this case, one can get a 'Masters" degree without a completing HIgh School or a Baccalaureate. This subject came up with one of my Bible students earlier this week. I have been trying to get her to look into the Memorial (previous week) and mentioned how Jesus fulfilled/ replaced the Mosaic Law.  She added that many churches still collect tithes. So next time I will show her Matthew 10:8 to help her understand how principles instituted by Jesus are mentioned in other places of the Bible.  The reason this popped into my head is that many students in the GED program had finished 11 or 11.5 years of High school, and were testing in at an elementary school level.  I also had students come in for testing with a recent HS diploma who wanted to be placed in a vocational program (eighth grade reading required), and couldn't pass.  As for my former student with the Masters of Theology, all the math he needs is how to figure out tithes (tenths) on his calculator. Anyone is welcome to move this post if it is too far off topic. YS

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Even though I spent decades as a social worker, drug counselor, and school teacher (all high school academic subjects), I really learned how to teach in the now renamed Kingdom Ministry  School. It is the only school that actually teaches teachers how to teach. IMHO

Corollary: All of our brothers and sisters are qualified to teach. 

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I had an enlightening session yesterday afternoon with some sisters who are intending to start home education next school year.  I will be having the homeschoolers from our congregation for a full afternoon, primarily to teach the maths. I will give them a brief problem set to take home, in case they are out in service in the morning, and the mom wants to do some more math work at home (optional).  I would like to go over Spanish with them, too. I really have been wanting to brush up and improve on my Spanish, so here is an opportunity for my lazy self.  Right now there are only 3 children, so I can have them in a service group the morning of our math afternoon. Then we could practice some Spanish during our service morning. If any others from our cong or neighboring congregation want to join our math-day, they are welcome. If it becomes too big for one service car group morning with all homeschoolers, we can rotate.

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It is a blessing for me to enjoy time with the youth of our congregation since none of my adult sons is in the truth. Still praying. I don't know where you live, Sister Heather, but I wish it could be next door.  


  Edited by kejedo
left out a word

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JWTalk 19.10.11 by Robert Angle (changelog)