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The Challenges and Benefits of Home-Schooling

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For our family, homeschooling has been all beneficial.  My daughter is no longer locked inside an institution (with a cop standing guard) that is run by worldly people that have a government initiated curriculum.  She can pee when she wants, eat when she wants, speak when she wants, stand, sit etc. and not have to work the equivalent of a full-time job.  She is free from bullying, ranking, testing, grading, competition, exposure to holidays, self-centered behavior, lack of morality, patriotism, one sided history, false teachings, etc.  She is learning in an environment that emphasizes the need to know, love and rely on Jehovah.  Best thing we ever did.  I would never send her back to that lion's den. Too many parents I feel underestimate the damage that may be experienced by having our children exposed to this environment 35+ hours a week.  Many youth leave the truth not because they aren't convinced it's the truth but because the world has gradually enticed them into giving it a try.  I honestly would prefer to spare my child that.  And really organized public school is a modern entity.  Many ancient societies were quite advanced and learned despite the absence of formalized schooling.

Edited by Mom2Savannah
grammatical ommision

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Spent  quite some time this morning getting a copy of my NY State Teacher's license in case I can help some families in my congregation who are (or might be) homeschooling next year. Anyone in NY homeschooling? It's the most regulated and bizarre State  I could possibly imagine. :confused:

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I have had this recurring experience: A sister, now in her mid to late 20s, graduated from distance learning,  American School. She got a p/t job at the library and could not make change (small change) and got fired pronto. I tried to teach her (for free) how to count money, but found she could not perform basic math operations.  Her skills were at about first grade, and I started from scratch, but she got weary and fizzled out.

 

I have had this drama repeat itself through out experiences with young ones I tutored from the general community.

 

I'm now helping with a Home School Unbap pub. She was in public high school for part of last year.  She is doing Algebra 2 on a free homeschool resource site. It is multiple choice, and if one retakes the quizzes with enough guesses, the program moves you on.  I did a math assessment and she is very weak at addition and subtraction, and does not know how to multiply or divide, (even with a single digit divisor).  She has trouble identifying the subject and verb in a sentence.  She has taken British Lit on this same program, but I have reason to believe she watched the movies instead.  She told me she is very nervous around anyone, even with me tutoring her.  This week was the first time it was just her and me. I shall make sure other fam members are home during any future tutoring session. I could start her with review from  Khan Academy, b/c she says she prefers online work, but she would have to start at Grade three level; I know this will make her unhappy.  This student, as well as other high school age students I have worked with, has no concept of mathematics. They have always worked on calculators.

 

Others who are joining our home school sessions (free tutoring from me), next year, are still in public school now. I asked about things that have been covered in our local system to students who have been in this system since K (8 and 9 years).   They never covered US States and Capitals, multiplication facts, and basic English grammar. You guessed it, they have even seen US maps that do not include Michigan's upper peninsula. I guess it doesn't matter when the curriculum does not include US geography.  One thing our students excel in is reading comprehension due to our Bible reading program.

 

Any suggestions from families that are starting homeschooling with children who are exiting public school systems, in which they were 'successful or honor' students, but do not have the foundation of basic skills?   I know these young people have been brain saturated with the idea of a school level, and "do not want to go backwards." I have been told that by a young man  who is entering h/s and may be homeschooling next year.

 

 

 

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Sister Pauline I commend you for your efforts. Wow!  I am not a brainiac by any means, I can no longer formulate a simple equation, but I would be lost without basic geography (NPI).

Some of our current crop of young ministerial servants show an inability to manage congregation accounts. Our current accounting process is very simplified and does not even require reconciling the checkbook. (a lost art.) 

It is no wonder that so many adult children live with there parents, if they venture outside without a smart phone they are lost. No need to understand basic math, credit card companies  will do that for small fee.

I bemoan our current crop of young ones facing life and lacking skills I found to be necessary for survival. :(

Edited by Old

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p.s. When I said eight and nine years, I did not mean age. One is finishing seventh grade and the other is finishing eight grade. Add one school year each for Kindergarten.  Somehow many, many young ones graduate high schools with diplomas and no basic education..........it is like a man who built a house on the ground without a foundation. (Luke 6:48)
 Before I retired another teacher, unapologetically, explained to me that teachers have to allow cheating or they will be fired by principals who need to "show" improvement to keep their position (and funding).  Diplomas are granted, but not necessarily earned.  Thanks for the kudos brother Jerry. 

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They way they teach Math and Language etc. in the public school system is ridiculous to begin with in my opinion.  Many, many adults are inept in making correct change and are lacking in writing/language skills, but have graduated from 12 years of secular schooling.  Jehovah created us to be learners.  No one teaches us our native language or how to walk.  It's inherent in the creation of humans that we continue to learn our entire life.  Forcing a Math class does not teach Math.  These skills are designed to be acquired by living life.  My homeschooling 10 year old is an individual.  Not every child will be adept at Math.  The point is she is articulate, has a free mind as most homeschoolers do and has hours more to focus on what is important in this system.  And that would be to foster and develop an intimate relationship with her God.  Yes we have to make a living in this system but I often suspect that homeschoolers are held under a microscope.  They will be different from public school children but I like to focus on the highly developed sense of self and spirituality that many of them possess.  Many times their communication and independent thinking skills are superior to other children.  Look at it in terms of the unique situation they are in.  We don't focus on Math or diagramming a sentence.  She grasps Math.  I'm ok if she needs a calculator for some Math problems.  I don't fix my car or even know how it works.  My husband does though.  All of our children are skilled at something.  We should strive to find that and nurture it.  I bet anyone on this website will be lacking in some of the subjects learned in public school.   Public school is a man made institution and the demands are academic standards.  The states have leniency and leave latitude for Christian parents to focus on what is important to each family.  But as a certified teacher in the state of Massachusetts I homeschool my daughter in complete contrast to the way they are taught in school.  I am almost 50 and I have met hundreds of homeschooled children.  They are bright and amazing and use the God given mind they were given to continue learning.  Not having good Math skills is not unique to homeschoolers is what I'm saying.  Some people are more creative and abstract.  Public school makes no allowance for differences.  I'm fine with using the mind she was born with to mentor her in a direction that challenges her without having her learning be identical to every other child in school.  I see many children in the congregation who attend public school(some academically gifted, some not) straying from the truth and getting love interests.  Whatever she lacks in this system can be learned, but I cannot ever get back these years if she was in the public school institution.  I think people need to see things from a different perspective.

On 11/1/2015 at 0:06 AM, kejedo said:

 

 

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I'd hope that the number of public schooled kids not having workable math skills is not the measure we use for homeschooled kids.  Anyone beyond 8th grade level who doesn't know their time tables - by heart - and can't figure above basic math calculations without a calculator is ill-equipped for adulthood.  Good reading, etc. doesn't cover that lack... each skill fills its own niche.  There are just some things we NEED to know in order to function.  The ignorance Pauline described is appalling!  :o

 

Being properly educated is not mutually exclusive to having a spiritual outlook on life, I don't think. :( 

Edited by Hope

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1 hour ago, Mom2Savannah said:

They way they teach Math and Language etc. in the public school system is ridiculous to begin with in my opinion.  Many, many adults are inept in making correct change and are lacking in writing/language skills, but have graduated from 12 years of secular schooling.  Jehovah created us to be learners.  No one teaches us our native language or how to walk.  It's inherent in the creation of humans that we continue to learn our entire life.  Forcing a Math class does not teach Math.  These skills are designed to be acquired by living life.  My homeschooling 10 year old is an individual.  Not every child will be adept at Math.  The point is she is articulate, has a free mind as most homeschoolers do and has hours more to focus on what is important in this system.  And that would be to foster and develop an intimate relationship with her God.  Yes we have to make a living in this system but I often suspect that homeschoolers are held under a microscope.  They will be different from public school children but I like to focus on the highly developed sense of self and spirituality that many of them possess.  Many times their communication and independent thinking skills are superior to other children.  Look at it in terms of the unique situation they are in.  We don't focus on Math or diagramming a sentence.  She grasps Math.  I'm ok if she needs a calculator for some Math problems.  I don't fix my car or even know how it works.  My husband does though.  All of our children are skilled at something.  We should strive to find that and nurture it.  I bet anyone on this website will be lacking in some of the subjects learned in public school.   Public school is a man made institution and the demands are academic standards.  The states have leniency and leave latitude for Christian parents to focus on what is important to each family.  But as a certified teacher in the state of Massachusetts I homeschool my daughter in complete contrast to the way they are taught in school.  I am almost 50 and I have met hundreds of homeschooled children.  They are bright and amazing and use the God given mind they were given to continue learning.  Not having good Math skills is not unique to homeschoolers is what I'm saying.  Some people are more creative and abstract.  Public school makes no allowance for differences.  I'm fine with using the mind she was born with to mentor her in a direction that challenges her without having her learning be identical to every other child in school.  I see many children in the congregation who attend public school(some academically gifted, some not) straying from the truth and getting love interests.  Whatever she lacks in this system can be learned, but I cannot ever get back these years if she was in the public school institution.  I think people need to see things from a different perspective.

 

I see you don't use paragraphs, were you home-schooled to?

 

Just kidding sister! :lol::D

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1 minute ago, Musky said:

I see you don't use paragraphs, were you home-schooled to?

 

Just kidding sister! :lol::D

Do you meant "too"?  It is one thought and not a term paper.  No I did not.  It wasn't very popular back in the 70's and 80's.

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1 hour ago, Hope said:

I'd hope that the number of public schooled kids not having workable math skills is not the measure we use for homeschooled kids.  Anyone beyond 8th grade level who doesn't know their time tables - by heart - and can't figure above basic math calculations without a calculator is ill-equipped for adulthood.  Good reading, etc. doesn't cover that lack... each skill fills its own niche.  There are just some things we NEED to know in order to function.  The ignorance Pauline described is appalling!  :o

 

Being properly educated is not mutually exclusive to having a spiritual outlook on life, I don't think. :( 

 

No one needs to memorize times tables.  It's nice if you do have them memorized.  Glad you speak for yourself.  You sound very closed minded and didn't grasp the nature of my comments.  All the homeschoolers and public schoolers I have met function just fine in this system.

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Public education is a government entity.  Whether you feel Math skills need to be at a certain level or not is one's own opinion.  I comply with my state laws.  And I feel developing a bond with our God certainly equips her for eternal life.  That is my top priority in this critical system.  We see too many children in the congregation straying from the Truth.  I love the fact that my daughter is bright and articulate but in the end those are not traits/qualities that are requisites for eternal life.  So if you are going to critique children then critique the level of spiritual education because not everyone esteems the same academic skills.  I think communication, articulation and empathy are highly important, but complex/abstract Math, not so much.  I was a secular teacher.  I think learning is awesome and important.  I just see that it's far less complicated and far more organic than people think.  I think in this system people are fooling themselves by thinking public education is teaching our kids and offering them something valuable.  

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32 minutes ago, Mom2Savannah said:

No one needs to memorize times tables.  It's nice if you do have them memorized.  Glad you speak for yourself.  You sound very closed minded and didn't grasp the nature of my comments.  All the homeschoolers and public schoolers I have met function just fine in this system.

Not the usual way we talk about each other on JWTalk. This a forum of opinions. When an opinion is put forth that you disagree with, then they are, close minded?

Many posting here probably agree with HOPE's comment, does that make us close minded? Most think I am too open minded for my own good and I agree with her, probably because I come from a close minded engineering background. :)

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Not sure how knowing what 8 x 7 equals without counting on one's fingers or how to break up a wall of text into readable chunks with a discernible subject is a danger to spirituality, but we all have our priorities.

 

And if my initial post was read carefully, you'll notice I didn't compare homeschooled children negatively at all.  I said I'd hoped the measure of their success/abilities was not compared against poorly educated public schoolchildren.

Edited by Hope

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2 hours ago, Mom2Savannah said:

 I see many children in the congregation who attend public school(some academically gifted, some not) straying from the truth and getting love interests.

.....and here lies the crux of why emotions flare when homeschool is discussed. To generalize that children that attend public schools stray from the truth and get love interest  is not correct. Children make choices --some of these choices are good and some are not. Homeschooling does not guarantee that children will make the truth their own.  Similarly, public schools do not guarantee that children will make the truth their own. 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, Hope said:

Being properly educated is not mutually exclusive to having a spiritual outlook on life, I don't think

 

This is really well said Hope. 

2 hours ago, Mom2Savannah said:

Yes we have to make a living in this system but I often suspect that homeschoolers are held under a microscope.

Sarah, you should never feel that you are under a microscope. You should do what feels right for your child. However, sometimes homeschool parents tend to judge parents that send their own children to secular schools are deficient. This is just not the case. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by alba aurora

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22 minutes ago, Old said:

I don't expect people to agree with me, but when people say things like "Anyone beyond 8th grade level who doesn't know their time tables - by heart - and can't figure above basic math calculations without a calculator is ill-equipped for adulthood."  I think that is not being open minded.  Who is to say who is equipped for life or adulthood? Or this:   "There are just some things we NEED to know in order to function.  The ignorance Pauline described is appalling!"  I think the level of judgement on academics is not looking at the whole picture.  That is my opinion!  Myself and a few other sisters asked for this to be started for a supportive forum that was pro homeschooling.  I think assuming people can't function without your opinion of what is needed in the realm of academics is assuming a lot.  I take issue with that, but that is my opinion.  I see that it differs from others.  I get it.

 

 

22 minutes ago, Old said:

Not the usual way we talk about each other on JWTalk. This a forum of opinions. When an opinion is put forth that you disagree with, then they are, close minded?

Many posting here probably agree with HOPE's comment, does that make us close minded? Most think I am too open minded for my own good and I agree with her, probably because I come from a close minded engineering background. :)

 

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