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In another homeschool blog, I noticed the suggestion to have a cemetery field trip.  I would suggest a similar visit, but with the view toward imagining the resurrections  of such ones. Of course, the math of timelines and historical events and JW hist) can be included on the time graph. But I would invite the students to look at the info on the graves and wonder how the families felt when this relative passed away and how all will feel during the time of resurrections. The students can come up with empathetic thoughts and scriptures (If they are old enough to do so). None of the home scholars in this area have relatives in nearby cemeteries. I pass through a small cemetery near the home of one of my Bible students. I have had conversations and placed literature, there.      There are some relatively new graves.  I may write letters to the families.

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This reminded me of the time many years ago when we would go to the cemeteries and witness to those visiting the sites of loved ones. One conversation always stayed with me with parents visiting their child's grave because they said they knew for a fact that she died due to blood transfusions..sad.:(

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Sister Sandra, I'm glad you posted this. You and your family have done well in serving Jehovah and bringing hope to people in pain from this messed up system.  I was wondering if it was a stupid idea (on my part). I will run it by the parents of home school families in our local cong. 

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While it's an awesome idea ... and if one is careful could lead to a positive conversation - dealing with grief is vast, varied and complex.  As long as one can discern when its not a good time to say anything it could be good.  I spend  a lot of time in cemeteries and deal with grief daily ... sometimes i get to share a scripture or mention jw.org but many times the body language and the level of grief doesn't allow me to. I'd rather speak to them face to face than write letters but that's a personal thing based on my experience. Would love to hear any experiences.

 

As far as a field trip for the kids ... it could be a very good idea ... I have a ressurrection book ... I enter names of those I know who have died, relatives, friends, witnesses and clients - sometimes if read through it and it reminds me of those who were with us once and will be again. Perhaps you could get the children to write down the names of the ones they want to meet when they come back?  See if they can learn more about them?

 

 


  Edited by Stormswift

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On 8/26/2017 at 2:17 AM, kejedo said:

In another homeschool blog, I noticed the suggestion to have a cemetery field trip.  I would suggest a similar visit, but with the view toward imagining the resurrections  of such ones. Of course, the math of timelines and historical events and JW hist) can be included on the time graph. But I would invite the students to look at the info on the graves and wonder how the families felt when this relative passed away and how all will feel during the time of resurrections. The students can come up with empathetic thoughts and scriptures (If they are old enough to do so). None of the home scholars in this area have relatives in nearby cemeteries. I pass through a small cemetery near the home of one of my Bible students. I have had conversations and placed literature, there.      There are some relatively new graves.  I may write letters to the families.

I like your idea sis kejedo and its nice to eat and wind up in there too. Play some bible games or eat in a fire :)

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I think this is an interesting idea that  I had never thought about.  I often talk of my parents, grandparents, old JW friends, etc., and reminisce  of past times and experiences especially in the service.  Not many of us 'old folks' left to do that and so many new things.  But, a caution from the CO yesterday in his last talk "Do Not Look At the Things Behind" - there are three areas that can tempt you to turn around:  one area was that that older ones talk about 'good ole' days.   He said:  Today we really don't have a clear focus of those days.  We all are born in the last days after 1914 (unless you are very old, he said) so don't look back.  Eccl 7:10. ................the danger is  like the Israelites in Moses' day - they were slaves then freed - then they longed for the food - so, don't long to be taken back to Egypt.  Sorry, this point really stuck in my mind.

 

But, I do like the history that could be given to young folks.  Actually I started a picture book of sorts to show my great grandchildren the pix of their great, great grandparents in service!  I haven't finished it but hope to soon.  There are very few living today who have such an old rich history of theocratic times.  Usually seen only in films and pictures from our organization and in publications.  

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Glad you mentioned this. I forgot about that subject and have been working on a Rail-Trail -Canal-history-math-day.  It will cover distance problems, walking the rails, map reading, historic designations; definitions like berme, iron horse, towpath; directions (NE, SW for example) why waters run in opposing directions, and how travel modes were inspired, i.e. in this area, the financially driven desire to deliver anthracite coal was a significant factor. Meet me at the next stop- Petticoat Junction. 


  Edited by kejedo

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JWTalk 19.10.11 by Robert Angle (changelog)