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How do English speaking brothers and sisters outside the US feel about watching jw videos with an American accent

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2 hours ago, hatcheckgirl said:

King of Assyria's voice sounds like it should be in that deliberate American accent :lol:.  If it were in Australian, too lackadaisical.  If it were in a Cockney accent, wouldn't sound authoritarian.  If it were in Queen's English, would sound too stuffy.  But if it were in a New Zealand accent, whoa! :lol1:

It would have been hilarious if he had a strong southern/Texas accent :lol:

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13 hours ago, Hope said:

Here are some fun American accents!

 

 

 

That was a hoot, but not so much an American accent, as much as an example of:

 

Af·ri·can A·mer·i·can Ver·nac·u·lar Eng·lish    
 
  form of American English: the variety of English spoken by many African Americans

 

 

African American Vernacular English, or AAVE, is the term used by scholars for the widespread and varied African American usages of the English Language, also called Ebonics, Afro-American English, American Black English, Black English, Black English Vernacular, and Black Vernacular English. Originating in the pidgin of the slave trade and Plantation Creole in the U.S. Southern states, African American Vernacular English considerably influenced U.S. Southern English and, in the late 19th and the 20th centuries, spread by migration through much of the nation. It therefore has both rural and urban components. It has also come to be associated with the language of blues, jazz, and rap music.

 

As with African English, African American Vernacular English does not pronounce r in words such as art, door, and worker. Other characteristics, some going back to similar features of African languages, are: (1) the use of d and t instead of th, as in dem for them and tree for three; (2) the dropping of l, as in hep for help, sef for self, and too for tool; (3) consonant reduction at the ends of some words (including tense endings), as in wha for what, jus for just, and pas for past; (4) use of -n for -ing, as in runnin for running; (5) multiple negatives, as in no way nobody can do it; (6) verb aspects marked for intermittent, momentary, or continuous action rather than tense per se, the tense time being apparent from the contexts, as in he be laughin for he is always laughing and he run for he runs; and (7) dropping of the verb in some constructions, as in she sick and he gone for she is sick and he has gone.

 

African American Vernacular English expressions have contributed to the rich texture of American English, these terms being typical: yam (sweet potato), goober (peanut), okra, gumbo (the soup and the river mud), tote (carry), juke, mumbo jumbo, hep/hip, and boogie woogie. All these are rooted in African languages. In its more urban settings, African American Vernacular English's contributions are also many, these few examples making the point: dis (to disrespect), igg (to ignore), chill out (to stop behaving stupidly), 'tude (attitude), the Man (the police), hang-up (a problem), rap (to talk), make it (succeed), kicks (pleasure), and the sense of bad meaning variously "good," "extraordinary," and "beautiful."

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after all that.... it's still an American accent, right?  as in... an accent we have here in America/United States.  :) 

 

i believe an "accent" at its base refers to the particular way a group of people pronounce or phrase the words of their language.  we could break it down further as to exactly how and who does it and when.. but that's just a lot, don't you think?  B)

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19 hours ago, Hope said:

Here are some fun American accents!

 

 

I know it’s supposed to be a joke but being African American, I don’t find black women talking in such a loud, obnoxious and stereotypical way for laughs funny but rather annoying...

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I'm half African American.. and a woman - I've seen this video many, many times and it cracks me up each time.

 

I do think that "annoying" is one of the desired effects, however... :)   C'mon... none of you liked Mrs Noah?  She was all about "obedience is better than sacrifice"...

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5 hours ago, minister159 said:

 

That was a hoot, but not so much an American accent, as much as an example of:

 

Af·ri·can A·mer·i·can Ver·nac·u·lar Eng·lish    
 
  form of American English: the variety of English spoken by many African Americans

I don’t know any African Americans that talk like that...

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Personally, I'd love more ethnic accents for our dramas and Bible readings.  Properly Middle Eastern for some characters.  I envision (and can do!) a lovely New York Jewish Mama accent for Naomi in the book of Ruth.  It could really bring things to life!  :D

1 minute ago, Brother Jack said:

I don’t know any African Americans that talk like that...

 

Me neither, to be honest.  The video was GREATLY exaggerated.

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4 minutes ago, Hope said:

I'm half African American.. and a woman - I've seen this video many, many times and it cracks me up each time.

 

I do think that "annoying" is one of the desired effects, however... :)   C'mon... none of you liked Mrs Noah?  She was all about "obedience is better than sacrifice"...

I will admit that it was funny when Job’s wife said “GET YO LIFE” at the 2:43 mark :lol:

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The same could be said of the way they portray the "Southern American" accent. I live in the South and have a wife that is many, many generations Floridian as well as children raised entirely in Florida (I have only lived here since I was 8) and none of them talk like a "Southern Bell" - that accent is also not "real" or common ....

 

So, I guess it is all in the way you look at it :shrugs:

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What makes it funny is how over the top it is.   There are stereotypes of white people which are funny as well.  SNL has a skit called “The Californians”. It is an exaggerated take on a group of people.  It makes Southern California people look vain and superficial.  I have blonde hair, but if a blonde joke is good, I will laugh at it. 

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3 hours ago, Brother Jack said:

I will admit that it was funny when Job’s wife said “GET YO LIFE” at the 2:43 mark :lol:

 

True! Why, haven't you seen the ethnic version of Shōgun: The Musical?  It's called:  "Sho-nuff". :shifty:

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On 17/10/2017 at 6:27 AM, Hope said:

Brother Sydlik is always and forever "Pharoah"... when he gave a talk at a special assembly years ago, we gathered all the kiddies and asked him to say, "we don't need more frogs, get rid of these!"  :D  He did so with great glee!

 

I think it would be very cool to be known for a particular voice.  "TREASON!!! TREACHERY!!!"  :D 

Daughter of a worthless maid.

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On 10/16/2017 at 12:27 PM, Hope said:

 

 

I think it would be very cool to be known for a particular voice.  "TREASON!!! TREACHERY!!!"  :D 

There is a old video that shows the sister saying those words.  If I remember correctly, she has reddish hair?  I will try to look later, but if it’s in an old DVD, I don’t know if I’ll remember how to turn on my DVD player

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On 16/10/2017 at 8:27 PM, Hope said:

Brother Sydlik is always and forever "Pharoah"... when he gave a talk at a special assembly years ago, we gathered all the kiddies and asked him to say, "we don't need more frogs, get rid of these!"  :D  He did so with great glee!

 

I think it would be very cool to be known for a particular voice.  "TREASON!!! TREACHERY!!!"  :D 

Brilliant story!

 

The sister of the 'treason, treachery' fame appeared on one of our videos.

 

Which one, I am sure you will ask me next?  To which I will reply, "not a clue"!

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Re: X for xylophone, every where - I had a beautiful picture on my wall of a dear Christian couple whose last name is Baxter, and wanted to give them a copy along with an acrostic of their names. Except for that x. NO scripture (that I know of) begins with 'x'. So, next to the X  line i inserted: Xhosa uses 'Yehovah' as the Divine Name. pg. 1743, NWT, 2013 Edition

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JWTalk 19.10.11 by Robert Angle (changelog)