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Bible-Based Child Protection Packet Released

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5 hours ago, Myew said:

Leviticus

 

I feel like you are arguing from a very logical perspective and not considering a lot of emotional issues. Are human factors. I suppose a lot of victims don't want to be forced to share the embarassment with the world. It affects how people view the victim, and they may have good reason not to have to share. A virgin victim of rape in ancient Israel would have been viewed as "broken goods" by many men and have a hard time finding a husband. We are no longer under the mosaic law for many good reasons.

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I'm fine with being logical. Being logical is the only way that I can prepare for anything or follow through. Nobody can really say for sure how they will react in an emotional situation out of their control. (Jeremiah 17:9) The heart is more treacherous than anything else and is desperate. Who can know it? (Proverbs 28:26) Whoever trusts in his own heart is stupid, But the one who walks in wisdom will escape.

I don't feel that I'm dismissing the emotional context at all. Rather, I'm trying to direct people to the only solution that will allow them to cope and heal, because I have been through much of it myself. I know too well that even within the truth, many people hear the Bible's counsel on how to deal with trauma, but never actually listen, they don't take it to heart, they don't give in to Jehovah's compassion and mercy, and then they suffer far worse. Of course, I am in the wrong to think that someone can be forced to accept help, as usual. It has to come from within their own heart. They have to be willing to accept the help themselves. 'The heart is a door that can only be unlocked from the inside.' I guess we can do nothing more than try to show love and be 'hospitable without grumbling.', hoping that someday they will accept and appreciate help. I'm just bitter from seeing too many people being hardhearted and never taking that step, even given decades, and ingraining mental disorders into their children. (Job 6:25) Honest words are not painful! But what benefit can be found in your reproof? (Proverbs 14:10) The heart knows its own bitterness, And no outsider can share in its joy.

I don't see why we can't apply Jehovah's principles from the mosaic law in our lives today. His attitude and feelings on such matters have not changed. (Malachi 3:5, 6) “I will come near to you for judgment, and I will be a swift witness against the sorcerers, against the adulterers, against those who take false oaths, against those who defraud the hired worker, the widow, and the fatherless child, and against those who refuse to help the foreigner. These have not feared me,” says Jehovah of armies. 6 “For I am Jehovah; I do not change."

I also don't understand what 'damaged goods' has to do with our modern context. No loving Christian would view a person in that way. Rahab was a prostitute, but she became the mother to Boaz, who took in Ruth when she was a widow. Jehovah blessed both with husbands and put them in line as descendants of the Messiah for acting with faith. (James 2:24, 25) "You see that a man is to be declared righteous by works and not by faith alone. 25 In the same manner, was not Raʹhab the prostitute also declared righteous by works...?" (Ruth 2:11, 12) Boʹaz answered her: “A full report was made to me of all you have done for your mother-in-law after the death of your husband and how you left your father and your mother and the land of your relatives to go to a people whom you had not known before. 12 May Jehovah reward you for what you have done, and may there be a perfect wage for you from Jehovah the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to seek refuge.”

Everything I have ever read indicates that Jehovah is begging and pleading for people who have been abused to take action so that he can give them inner peace.

https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/101990170#h=11
The Bible does not say that God miraculously shields his people from harm. God’s laws to Israel indicated that rape could befall faithful servants of God. (Deuteronomy 22:23-27) However, God has provided us with Scriptural direction that can work for our benefit if we apply it. And the Bible-based advice on resisting rape proved to be a protection for the woman in question. Appropriately, she thanked God for providing this helpful information.—ED.

https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/101993163 How to Cope with Rape (Awake! 1993)

Spoiler

Some women continue to deny what happened by telling no one about their rape. They repress the attack for years, which delays the healing process and causes other emotional problems that the survivor may not realize are stemming from the rape.
 

Recovery doesn’t usually begin until you talk to others. A trusted friend can help you to see that what happened to you was indeed rape and was not your fault. An old proverb states: “A true companion is loving all the time, and is a brother that is born for when there is distress.” (Proverbs 17:17) Also, spiritual shepherds can “prove to be like a hiding place from the wind and a place of concealment from the rainstorm.” (Isaiah 32:2; 1 Thessalonians 5:14) For some victims, contacting a rape-crisis center or a professional counselor may be needed to help them sort out their feelings.
 

If the rape happened recently, friends can help the victim get medical help and can offer a safe place to stay. Encourage her to report the rape, but let her make the decisions. She has just come from a situation where she was stripped of all control. Allow her to take some of that control back by letting her choose what to do next.

Families of rape victims must resist the urge to react emotionally to the situation.
 

“Instead of telling yourself how weak, useless, or helpless you are, learn to tell yourself how well you are doing and how far you have come since the turmoil immediately following the assault,” said Linda Ledray in Recovering From Rape. “Each day that you feel less overwhelmed by negative thoughts and feelings, tell yourself, ‘I’m learning to take back control.’”
 

Call the police as soon as you are able to. Counselors recommend reporting for your safety and for the safety of other women. Reporting is not the same as prosecuting, but if you choose to prosecute later, your case will be weakened by a delayed report.


Forgive me if I have taken this off topic... I am very thankful that we have the new packet to help people understand clearly what steps to take to prevent abuse, and to protect children in the event that it happens. It's one of the worst things that can happen to anyone, yet we are not left in the dark about what actions we should take. Nothing compares to how Jehovah cares for and teaches his servants.

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On 5/16/2018 at 12:34 AM, ChocoBro said:

I feel like you are arguing from a very logical perspective and not considering a lot of emotional issues. Are human factors. I suppose a lot of victims don't want to be forced to share the embarassment with the world. It affects how people view the victim, and they may have good reason not to have to share.

Based on what I read from people who have been through this sort of litigation, they say that its awfully stressful and that they do not want their lives dissected. Others are willing to go through it to get the justice they rightfully deserve and are entitled to.

 

But I think part of what contributes to the stress is that when it comes to our organization, lawyers always sue the wrong people, which are almost always those with the deeper pockets (WTBTS) and they are willing to litigate for years with no regard to the victim(s) to make sure they maximize the size of their paycheck. Lawyers are obligated to make as much money for themselves and their law firm as humanly possible.

 

On the other hand, when someone wants to sue the organization for something they are not responsible for, we then become obligated to protect our finances from those who are clearly targeting our money. To simply hand out money when we are not responsible for the wrong, is irresponsible.  So our brothers have to litigate in such a way that makes those lawyers have to fight to for the money they want. This discourages frivolous litigation because of the money the opposing Law Firm would have to spend. No lawyer worth his/her salt will fight cases they cannot win. It is a waste of money. 

 

What is unfortunate is that the person who has been victimized is in the middle of a battle between two entities. Perhaps if our judicial system didn't simply throw money at problems, this could be minimized or eliminated. Its become a fight over money, and not justice for the victim/survivor.

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We have mentioned several times how the instructions published in The Watchtower at least from 1962 were that the victim of a crime (including of course rape and child abuse) has the right to report it to the authorities. The congregation doesn't protect criminals.

 

Well, it's actually older than 1962. Today I was doing some unrelated research on 1 Timothy 5:21 and the only reference was  w57 217. When I read that old article, I found the following:
 

Quote

Even though a close friendship may have been built up over the years or the offender might have been a member of the family, the overseer was obliged to see that Jehovah’s law was honored, “doing nothing according to a biased leaning.” No servant or any Christian may shield a wrongdoer from deserved punishment and expect Jehovah’s blessing. It is not a question of butting into the personal business of another, but when any uncleanness is permitted in a congregation or country the work does not prosper. Remember Achan had to be cleaned out of Israel before prosperity was restored and victory won. So for the sake of the organization and for the salvation of one who may have started going in the wrong way, never shield a wrongdoer, even though he be a close friend or member of the family. It is part of the Christian responsibility to keep the organization clean.—1 Tim. 5:19-21; Josh. 7:25, NW.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, carlos said:

We have mentioned several times how the instructions published in The Watchtower at least from 1962 were that the victim of a crime (including of course rape and child abuse) has the right to report it to the authorities. The congregation doesn't protect criminals.

 

Well, it's actually older than 1962. Today I was doing some unrelated research on 1 Timothy 5:21 and the only reference was  w57 217. When I read that old article, I found the following:
 

 

Yep, but many people (not anyone here) seem unable to wrap their heads around the fact that it’s a violation of those rights for the organization made it mandatory for members to report, if the State doesn’t make it mandatory. 

 

Ignoring an organizational mandate will bring sanctions for non-compliance. So imagine if there is no state mandate to report, but the organization took it upon themselves to mandate it upon all members. Can you image the backlash by these same hypocritical opposers if a person is sanctioned for exercising their rights to not report for whatever reason:

 

”How dare they violate the rights of their membership! Do they now want to “control” even what a person does or does not report to police?!?”

 

Best to respect our rights. 

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3 hours ago, Bob said:

Yep, but many people (not anyone here) seem unable to wrap their heads around the fact that it’s a violation of those rights for the organization made it mandatory for members to report, if the State doesn’t make it mandatory. 

I agree but I'm not sure if I'm not understanding your point or you are not understanding mine. :innocent:

 

I just quoted that magazine to show that it has never been our practice to cover child abusers or any criminals. The article deals mainly with congregational discipline, but if the wrongdoers had to face jail or other consequences for their crimes, we wouldn't protect them either. The congregation has to be clean, otherwise Jehovah could not bless it.

 

In other words, our organization has always acknowledged that any victim has the right to report the abuse to the authorities if they wish.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, carlos said:

I agree but I'm not sure if I'm not understanding your point or you are not understanding mine. :innocent:

 

I just quoted that magazine to show that it has never been our practice to cover child abusers or any criminals. The article deals mainly with congregational discipline, but if the wrongdoers had to face jail or other consequences for their crimes, we wouldn't protect them either. The congregation has to be clean, otherwise Jehovah could not bless it.

 

In other words, our organization has always acknowledged that any victim has the right to report the abuse to the authorities if they wish.

 

 

 

My bad. I was just building on the point you made about having the right to report. When you said that, it reminded me of rights afforded to us by law that the organization also respects.

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JWTalk 18.5.11 by Robert Angle (changelog)