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Not sure how reliable this paper is, but got this in my email today.

Source removed due to the NUMEROUS apostate comments at the bottom. The article states that this case has been aired on "America's Most Wanted" several times.

TORONTO -- Police are searching here for a US fugitive who they allege is a sexual predator who uses his position in his local congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses to get close to children.

Frederick Cecil McLean, 61, is among the US Marshals' 15 most wanted fugitives and is believed to be hiding in the Toronto area, police said Wednesday.

He is wanted in California on four counts of child molestation, as well as multiple counts of lewd and lascivious acts with a minor under 14 and unlawful flight to avoid prosecution.

McLean's story has been aired twice on the TV show America's Most Wanted without leading to his arrest.

An arrest warrant was issued for him in Jan. 2005, when police believe he fled to Canada.

The Marshals said McLean is accused of sexually assaulting four separate U.S. victims who were children under 14.

"One of the victims claims that McLean molested her over 100 times between 1991 and 1996," U.S. police said.

The Marshals allege McLean, who has a successful business restoring cars, gained access to many his victims through his involvement in a San Diego-area congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses.

Police said McLean fled the U.S. after being confronted by his family. He said then he was planning for his escape his whole life.

Police said as their probe widened, McLean sold his property, including houses and a lucrative race car business, and split the profits with his wife, whom he divorced.

The US Marshals estimate he fled to Canada with about $400,000 in cash to help him hide.

Police said McLean has been in touch with his family during the years on the run and was self-employed as a dealer and restorer of vintage race cars who liked to go primitive camping in the desert.

"McLean has been described as a loner with no real friends," the Marshals said. "He is considered armed and dangerous."

Anyone who has information on the fugitive is asked to call police.

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Notice the difference between Jehovah's people and say the Catholic Church (CC) - the CC would have just moved him to a different parish / congregation or circuit. JWs - he gets reported to the police and has been on the run for years. We did not hide him nor help him and he knew that would be the case. He had to save up $.4Million as he knew Jehovah's organization wouldn't want anything to do with him or his money.

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On JWMedia.org there is important information regarding our policy on child abuse. It can be found in the Family section.

Thank you for reminding me where this article can be found. In case someone can't find it immediately and also due to the seriousness of the subject I pasted below the complete article from jw-media.org. Also available en Español, it seems.

Our Families

Jehovah’s Witnesses and Child Protection

Child abuse is abhorrent to us. This is in harmony with the Bible principle recorded at Romans 12:9. Even one abused child is one too many. For decades The Watchtower and Awake! have featured articles to educate both Witnesses and the public regarding the importance and the need to protect children from child abuse. Among others, there were the articles “Let Us Abhor What Is Wicked!” published in the January 1, 1997, issue of The Watchtower; “Help for the Victims of Incest,” in the October 1, 1983, Watchtower; “Your Child Is in Danger!” “How Can We Protect Our Children?” and “Prevention in the Home”, all in the October 8, 1993, Awake!, as well as “Child Molesting—Every Mother’s Nightmare,” in the January 22, 1985, Awake!

When any one of Jehovah’s Witnesses is accused of an act of child abuse, the local congregation elders are expected to investigate. Two elders meet separately with the accused and the accuser to see what each says on the matter. If the accused denies the charge, the two elders may arrange for him and the victim to restate their position in each other’s presence, with elders also there. If during that meeting the accused still denies the charges and there are no others who can substantiate them, the elders cannot take action within the congregation at that time. Why not? As a Bible-based organization, we must adhere to what the Scriptures say, namely, “No single witness should rise up against a man respecting any error or any sin . . . At the mouth of two witnesses or at the mouth of three witnesses the matter should stand good.” (Deuteronomy 19:15) Jesus reaffirmed this principle as recorded at Matthew 18:15-17. However, if two persons are witnesses to separate incidents of the same kind of wrongdoing, their testimony may be deemed sufficient to take action.

However, even if the elders cannot take congregational action, they are expected to report the allegation to the branch office of Jehovah's Witnesses in their country, if local privacy laws permit. In addition to making a report to the branch office, the elders may be required by law to report even uncorroborated or unsubstantiated allegations to the authorities. If so, the elders receive proper legal direction to ensure that they comply with the law. Additionally, the victim or anyone else who has knowledge of the allegation may wish to report the matter to the authorities, and it is his or her absolute right to do so.

If, when confronted, the accused confesses that he is guilty of child abuse, the elders take appropriate congregational action. If he is not repentant, he will not be permitted to remain a member of the congregation. Even if he is repentant—is cut to the heart and is thus resolutely determined to avoid such conduct in the future—what was stated in the January 1, 1997, issue of The Watchtower applies. The article said: “For the protection of our children, a man known to have been a child molester does not qualify for a responsible position in the congregation. Moreover, he cannot be a pioneer [full-time missionary of Jehovah’s Witnesses] or serve in any other special, full-time service.” He would not qualify Scripturally. (1 Timothy 3:2, 7-10) We take such action because we are concerned with maintaining Bible standards and protecting our children. Everyone in our organization is expected to meet the same requirements, namely, to be clean physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually.—2 Corinthians 7:1; Ephesians 4:17-19; 1 Thessalonians 2:4.

In a few instances, individuals guilty of an act of child abuse have been appointed to positions within the congregation if their conduct has been otherwise exemplary for decades. All the factors are considered carefully. Suppose, for example, that a long time ago an 18-year-old male had sexual relations with a 15-year-old girl who was a willing participant. Depending upon the U.S. jurisdiction where he lived when this happened, elders may have been required to report this as an incident of child abuse. Let us say that 20 years have passed. He has been living an exemplary life and he is respected. In such a case, the man could possibly be appointed to a responsible position within the congregation.

Our procedures have been refined over time. Over the years, as we have noted areas where our policies could be strengthened, we have followed through. We are continuing to refine them. We do not believe that our system is perfect. No human organization is perfect. But we do believe that we have a strong, Bible-based policy on child abuse. Anyone in a responsible position who is guilty of child abuse would be removed from his responsibilities without hesitation. We certainly would not knowingly allow him to serve elsewhere, either because he moved or through a transfer. Further, we regularly review our procedures to ensure that they are in compliance with the law.—Romans 13:1.

The Bible teaches that individuals can repent of their sins and “turn to God by doing works that befit repentance,” and we accept what the Bible says. (Acts 26:20) Still, the safety of our children is of the utmost importance. We take it very seriously.

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The policy says that two witnesses of seperate incidents can be used by the congregation.

The information from AMW is either incorrect or matters were not handled correctly in his case somehow.

I've been checking from time to time to see if he has been caught yet for years on the US Marshall's 15 Most Wanted

site.Still not caught.I don't like reading much about the details or outside comments.

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On JWMedia.org there is important information regarding our policy on child abuse. It can be found in the Family section.

Thank you for reminding me where this article can be found. In case someone can't find it immediately and also due to the seriousness of the subject I pasted below the complete article from jw-media.org. Also available en Español, it seems.

Our Families

Jehovah’s Witnesses and Child Protection

In a few instances, individuals guilty of an act of child abuse have been appointed to positions within the congregation if their conduct has been otherwise exemplary for decades. All the factors are considered carefully. Suppose, for example, that a long time ago an 18-year-old male had sexual relations with a 15-year-old girl who was a willing participant. Depending upon the U.S. jurisdiction where he lived when this happened, elders may have been required to report this as an incident of child abuse. Let us say that 20 years have passed. He has been living an exemplary life and he is respected. In such a case, the man could possibly be appointed to a responsible position within the congregation.

Thank-you for bringing this letter up. I have never read it before. I never knew about this section. My understanding had always been that once a person was accused, and even if it found out to be a false accusation, that brother still could never be used again. I need to print this out and go over it with the rest of the body of Elders and make should we all have the correct understanding of this matter.

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My understanding had always been that once a person was accused' date=' and even if it found out to be a false accusation, that brother still could never be used again.[/quote']

Why could that person not be used if they found out it was just a false accusation? If that's the case, it seems to me, that a lot would not be elders and MS's....

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I found this at America's Most Wanted. This horrible man needs to be caught!

Thanks for the extra info on the guy, although that article is clearly very misinformed on how Jehovah's Witnesses handle child abuse.

The following link is by a brother debunking the apostates' claims in this area: http://thirdwitness.com/childabuse/default.html

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Why could that person not be used if they found out it was just a false accusation? If that's the case, it seems to me, that a lot would not be elders and MS's....

I don't think that many elders and MSes have had false accusations of child abuse.

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Why could that person not be used if they found out it was just a false accusation? If that's the case, it seems to me, that a lot would not be elders and MS's....

I don't think that many elders and MSes have had false accusations of child abuse.

Let me give you a good example:

When I worked for Department of Juvenile Justice and a juvenile, which is anybody under the age of 18, was having consensual encounters with let's just say a fifteen year old, they could still be charged with statutory rape. Parents of the victim filed charges. If found guilty, that stigma would be with him the rest of his life. Mind you they were a couple, but this as the parents perogative. His whole life would be under a microscope. This is a matter not to be taken lightly. The matter has a greater weight if it involves Jehovah's congregation. Believe me, elders must thoroughly investigate this matter and if probable cause exist and this matter taken to the authorities, that brother or sister being accused is essentially done in the eyes of man and his laws. Jehovah will forgive if the heart is contrite, but he will be stigmatized with man's due process. In Florida it's called the Jimmy Rice Act.

He won't be able to live in any neighborhood because he will be classified as a sexual predator. He cant live close to a school, daycare center, etc. In today's laws to protect the community, he must report to the local LEO agency and sometimes his or her name must be published to warn his immediate locals. In Jehovah's organization, he must bear up to scrutiny within and outside the walls of the KH. Lets say for matters of simplicity that it was a false accusation. People being imperfect will wonder and speculate. The brother's good name is tarnished for the time being. Now the brother must wait until the matter dies down. There is so much paranoia now with other religions and their media hurricanes about sexual abuse that people are quick to make judgements and throw them in jail.

I know of a brother who, one week before his wedding, was accused of sexual abuse of a minor. He lost everything. Later, investigators found out it was false. The child's mother thought that she would get her immigrant status processed faster if she was a victim of a crime. This was terrible for the brother who sat in one of e worst jails in Florida. Just imagine what the brothers thought or even his fiancée.

It's tragic but this is more common than many people think and it happens in our organization.

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Later, investigators found out it was false. The child's mother thought that she would get her immigrant status processed faster if she was a victim of a crime.

That's terrible David! Do you know how it was found out that she lied for that particular purpose? (the immigrant status) Did she confess it was for that reason?

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Why could that person not be used if they found out it was just a false accusation? If that's the case, it seems to me, that a lot would not be elders and MS's....

I don't think that many elders and MSes have had false accusations of child abuse.

Let me give you a good example:

When I worked for Department of Juvenile Justice and a juvenile, which is anybody under the age of 18, was having consensual encounters with let's just say a fifteen year old, they could still be charged with statutory rape. Parents of the victim filed charges. If found guilty, that stigma would be with him the rest of his life. Mind you they were a couple, but this as the parents perogative. His whole life would be under a microscope. This is a matter not to be taken lightly. The matter has a greater weight if it involves Jehovah's congregation. Believe me, elders must thoroughly investigate this matter and if probable cause exist and this matter taken to the authorities, that brother or sister being accused is essentially done in the eyes of man and his laws. Jehovah will forgive if the heart is contrite, but he will be stigmatized with man's due process. In Florida it's called the Jimmy Rice Act.

He won't be able to live in any neighborhood because he will be classified as a sexual predator. He cant live close to a school, daycare center, etc. In today's laws to protect the community, he must report to the local LEO agency and sometimes his or her name must be published to warn his immediate locals. In Jehovah's organization, he must bear up to scrutiny within and outside the walls of the KH. Lets say for matters of simplicity that it was a false accusation. People being imperfect will wonder and speculate. The brother's good name is tarnished for the time being. Now the brother must wait until the matter dies down. There is so much paranoia now with other religions and their media hurricanes about sexual abuse that people are quick to make judgements and throw them in jail.

I know of a brother who, one week before his wedding, was accused of sexual abuse of a minor. He lost everything. Later, investigators found out it was false. The child's mother thought that she would get her immigrant status processed faster if she was a victim of a crime. This was terrible for the brother who sat in one of e worst jails in Florida. Just imagine what the brothers thought or even his fiancée.

It's tragic but this is more common than many people think and it happens in our organization.

Thanks for sharing the experience, and yes it is tragic. Illustrates why hard and fast rules even in this matter may not always be good.

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