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Homeschooling resources......

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On 1/28/2016 at 1:20 PM, kejedo said:

Is there a place to find  a NY step by step plan (other than the state regs, which are daunting)?  

It seems daunting at first, but it's not really that difficult. Our district is very supportive, and I would imagine many of them would be. Here are the requirements:

  • You send in your Letter of Intent (LOI) to homeschool to the district
  • Then you send them your Individualized Home Instruction Plan (IHIP)
  • You then need to send in quarterly reports
  • At the end of the year you administer an achievement test

We've had quite a few families in our Hall begin to homeschool their kids this year, and I've noticed they've tended towards Pearblossom, maybe so they don't have to worry about coming up with an IHIP. That's undoubtedly the hardest part of the process, but unless your kid enjoys learning from books all day, it's worth it to come up with a plan that can make learning fun. 

Here are a couple of links to the NYS requirements:

http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/new_york.pdf

http://homeschoolnyc.com/homeschooling-ten-steps/law.html#loi

 

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I would like to let everyone know about a series of math books that helped me a lot when I home schooled and has helped others.

They are called Saxon Math Books.  I feel they are very good although they probably aren't for everyone.  They are expensive but I believe you can find them used on Amazon.   Sometimes you can get books from other home schoolers. 

 

 They have an integrative approach.  For example they teach Algebra and geometry in the same books.  Such as the Algebra 2 book that I have it has portions of geometry in it as well.  The same with their Advanced Mathematics Book.  They also use an incremental little by little approach introducing a new skill or principle each day then reviewing these concepts and skills day after day for weeks.  

 

They have lessons, practice math sections after each lesson and then the actual homework and tests.  They also have answer keys for the parents.

I know that many have liked the American Home School Program and the Thompson Program which at least in the past were less expensive than the Pear Blossom Program.  

https://www.homeschool.com/resources/americanschool/

 

Couldn't find the website for the Thompson program.

 

Some public schools and or school districts have online programs.

 

For parents of blind children if there are any on here. The Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired formerly called the Hadley School for the Blind has an accredited distance education program for blind and visually impaired students ages fourteen and above.   If the young person completes the full program they will receive a diploma. Most  course materials are available in braille, audio and large print.  A student that does not know braille can also learn braille through their program although it is harder doing so through a correspondence program.

http://www.hadley.edu/

 

 

I hope that this helps.

 

 

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6 hours ago, JW2017 said:

I would like to let everyone know about a series of math books that helped me a lot when I home schooled and has helped others.

They are called Saxon Math Books.  I feel they are very good although they probably aren't for everyone.  They are expensive but I believe you can find them used on Amazon.   Sometimes you can get books from other home schoolers. 

 

 They have an integrative approach.  For example they teach Algebra and geometry in the same books.  Such as the Algebra 2 book that I have it has portions of geometry in it as well.  The same with their Advanced Mathematics Book.  They also use an incremental little by little approach introducing a new skill or principle each day then reviewing these concepts and skills day after day for weeks.  

 

They have lessons, practice math sections after each lesson and then the actual homework and tests.  They also have answer keys for the parents.

I know that many have liked the American Home School Program and the Thompson Program which at least in the past were less expensive than the Pear Blossom Program.  

https://www.homeschool.com/resources/americanschool/

 

Couldn't find the website for the Thompson program.

 

Some public schools and or school districts have online programs.

 

For parents of blind children if there are any on here. The Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired formerly called the Hadley School for the Blind has an accredited distance education program for blind and visually impaired students ages fourteen and above.   If the young person completes the full program they will receive a diploma. Most  course materials are available in braille, audio and large print.  A student that does not know braille can also learn braille through their program although it is harder doing so through a correspondence program.

http://www.hadley.edu/

 

 

I hope that this helps.

 

 

Wow, I was worried that you might be a silent member. Continue to speak, so many sisters feel they have nothing to say, keep it up!

Waiting int the wings. :touche:

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I attended American School starting in 1976, I'm a non-conformist and have always felt children should have their education adapted to the way their individual brains work instead of like automatons, all in a row...never individual creativity.

 

Whitney your post was great, I'm sharing this with MD who is homeschooling my GD. Math isn't MD strong point so this may be helpful for her to teach. I'm hoping my GD will have an affinity for math like I do, this might bring out her natural abilities if she's prone to them.

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Recently I learned about a series of books from another witness group I am on.  The books could be helpful with Math and History.  My kids are going to 9th so they may not be as helpful for them but thought I might get them for reference so I keep the links to them.  I wanted to share the titles.

 

Everything You Need to Ace Math in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks)

 

Everything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks)

 

Everything You Need to Ace World History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks)

 

They also have one for science (but I was concerned about how much they focus on evolution) so didn't include link.  You can find it on amazon yourself and look through the book to see if you can work around the evolution topics.

 

Disclaimer:  The 3 links above may contain an amazon affiliate id.  If so it would be that from the person that shared the link on the home school group I am a member of.  I personally do not make any $$ for sharing the links to these books.
 

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I am an adult and don't have any children.  But I bought a school book earlier this year used at Good Will, entitled: the United States and Its Neighbors which goes over history and geography.  It goes over the United States more than anything but also goes over places such as Canada and Mexico. 

 

Anyway I think it's a pretty cool book and I thought that I would mention it in case copies of it or books similar to it can be found somewhere else and someone on here would be interested.  The one I have which I would like to keep was published in the 1980's.   I imagine more recent copies can be found. 

Edited by JW2017
Punctuation

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Hi there. I was wondering if anyone has used thegoodandthebeautiful.com? They have free literature curriculum that also includes grammer, spelling, poetry, etc... several PDFs are free, but can be printed and shipped for a price.

I wanted a stronger LA program for my fifth grader and this is working out well. You can adminster a test to know what level your child is on. Surprisingly my 10 year old couldn't pass the level 3 assessment! So it looks like he's needing to close some learning gaps by going back a couple levels. I blame public school since this is our first year homeschooling. But anyway the program has helped to improve his reading and pronounciations. There are also Science units (no evolution ever mentioned) that my 4 yr old, 10 yr old and I enjoy! I haven't bought the History portion. I chose to go with The Story of World, which was referred to me from another JW homeschool mom. You can find those on Amazon or eBay. 

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