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Ash Wednesday


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Thanks, I will tell my boss, I'm sure he'll appreciate the advice LoL

 

If you do a google search for "Ash Wednesday" you will finf a lot of info on it. It is obviously NOT a Christian teaching - as the Bible doens't mention and 1st century christians walking ar ound with ashes on their foreheads.

 

In fact, INSTEAD - Jesus said - Matt 6:16-18

 

 

 

16 “When YOU are fasting,+ stop becoming sad-faced like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that they may appear to men to be fasting.+ Truly I say to YOU, They are having their reward in full. 17 But you, when fasting, grease your head and wash your face,+ 18 that you may appear to be fasting, not to men, but to your Father who is in secrecy;+ then your Father who is looking on in secrecy will repay you.

 

Doesn't putting ashes on ones face to show they are morning sound like the OPPOSITE of Jesus advise???

 

note: I especially like the part where Jesus said - "WASH YOUR FACE!!" not mark it!

 

O well, Catholics - what can you say.

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Hi Sister Delores,

 

I was raised Catholic until in 1995 I learned the Truth and was baptized.

Here is a little info for you.

I hope it helps you!

 

 

Ash Wednesday,

is the first day of the Roman Catholic forty-day Lenten season. During Lent, Catholics traditionally fast, eating only one full meal a day. 

 

*** w96 11/15 p. 6  ***


What, then, is the basis for Christendom’s practice of fasting during Lent?

Both Catholic and Protestant churches recognize Lent, although the manner of observing it differs from church to church. Some eat just one meal a day during the full 40-day period preceding Easter. Others fast totally only on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. For some, Lent requires abstaining from meat, fish, eggs, and milk products.

Lent is supposedly based on Jesus’ 40-day fast after his baptism. Was he then establishing a ritual to be followed yearly? Not at all. This is evident from the fact that the Bible does not record any such practice among the early Christians. Lent was first observed in the fourth century after Christ. Like many other teachings of Christendom, it was borrowed from pagan sources.

If Lent is in imitation of Jesus’ fasting in the wilderness after his baptism, why is it observed during the weeks leading up to Easter—supposedly the time of his resurrection? Jesus did not fast during the days prior to his death. The Gospel accounts indicate that he and his disciples visited homes and ate meals in Bethany just a few days before he died. And he ate the Passover meal the night before his death.—Matthew 26:6, 7; Luke 22:15; John 12:2.

There is something to be learned from Jesus’ fasting after his baptism. He was embarking on a vital ministry. The vindication of Jehovah’s sovereignty and the future of the entire human race were involved. This was a time for deep meditation and for prayerfully turning to Jehovah for help and guidance. During this time Jesus appropriately fasted. This indicates that fasting can be beneficial when done with the right motive and on a fitting occasion.—Compare Colossians 2:20-23.

 

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It's kind of funny that they celebrate Lent "leading up to Easter", something they celebrate ONCE a year. Both things, Lent and Easter are NOT things that the early Christians celebrated but were introduced by men at a later time.

 

At the same time, the ONE thing Jesus did tell them to do, commemorating the establishment of the covenant with the bread and wine, they want to do everyday, each week, every month or how ever often they decide instead of ONE a year, as Jesus Apostles did.

 

They sure do have things turned around all kinds of backwards ......

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I saw on the news last night where one Catholic priest was offering a "Drive through Ash and Coffee".  As the people drove through the parking lot, the priest would put ash on their forehead, bless them, and give them a cup o' Joe.  His reasoning was that Jesus didn't build a building and tell people to come in.  He went out to the people.  I think he missed the point entirely.

 

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sounds like a great place to go for break   ...   skip the ash, grab free coffee and hand out truth tracts + new tracts w/website on it - have folks scan the Bible Study QR   ...   we'll see you on the 6pm news! 

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Hi Sister Delores,
 
I was raised Catholic until in 1995 I learned the Truth and was baptized.
Here is a little info for you.
I hope it helps you!
 
 
Ash Wednesday,
is the first day of the Roman Catholic forty-day Lenten season. During Lent, Catholics traditionally fast, eating only one full meal a day. 
 
*** w96 11/15 p. 6  ***
What, then, is the basis for Christendom’s practice of fasting during Lent?
Both Catholic and Protestant churches recognize Lent, although the manner of observing it differs from church to church. Some eat just one meal a day during the full 40-day period preceding Easter. Others fast totally only on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. For some, Lent requires abstaining from meat, fish, eggs, and milk products.
Lent is supposedly based on Jesus’ 40-day fast after his baptism. Was he then establishing a ritual to be followed yearly? Not at all. This is evident from the fact that the Bible does not record any such practice among the early Christians. Lent was first observed in the fourth century after Christ. Like many other teachings of Christendom, it was borrowed from pagan sources.
If Lent is in imitation of Jesus’ fasting in the wilderness after his baptism, why is it observed during the weeks leading up to Easter—supposedly the time of his resurrection? Jesus did not fast during the days prior to his death. The Gospel accounts indicate that he and his disciples visited homes and ate meals in Bethany just a few days before he died. And he ate the Passover meal the night before his death.—Matthew 26:6, 7; Luke 22:15; John 12:2.
There is something to be learned from Jesus’ fasting after his baptism. He was embarking on a vital ministry. The vindication of Jehovah’s sovereignty and the future of the entire human race were involved. This was a time for deep meditation and for prayerfully turning to Jehovah for help and guidance. During this time Jesus appropriately fasted. This indicates that fasting can be beneficial when done with the right motive and on a fitting occasion.—Compare Colossians 2:20-23.
 

 

 

To take this a bit further, one can ask why Jesus fasting at the beginning of his ministry is celebrated at the end of his ministry. As I understand it, there is a close connection with Easter. Easter is a goddess of firtility. In her honor her worshippers (whore shippers, lol) would engage in all mannor of sexual conduct including orgies, adultry, etc... . The days leading up to it were days of abstenance in her honor. As with other pagan feast days Constatine orchastrated this change so that the pagans could be called Christian while not missing out on a treasured feast day. The Mardigras is a form of that ritual. 

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