Jump to content
JWTalk - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

Safety while Working or Pioneering in Hot Weather.


We lock topics that are over 365 days old, and the last reply made in this topic was 2920 days ago. If you want to discuss this subject, we prefer that you start a new topic.

Recommended Posts

For those of us that live in the upper parts of North America the changes in weather from spring into summer brings dangers that we are not used to dealing with. Heat and humidity bring dangers. Some things we may not be aware of I will list and talk about. We can take precautions to avoid these and prevent hurting ourselves and those with us.

 

 

First thing that we should be aware of is the need for our body to cool itself. It does this by sweating and the evaporation of the sweat.

 

When the temp climbs the our bodies pour liquid out at a furious rate. This can put us in danger. Especially if we have to exert ourselves physically while we work in this heat.

 

Some signs of trouble when working in the heat are the following.

 

If you are thirsty you have the first sign of dehydration. You should drink a minimum of 10 ounces or a half liter of water per hour. 

 

If you have stopped having to urinate. This is the second and more dangerous sign. If you have not had to go in at least 2 hours drink the same amount of water every 1/2 hour until you have to go. If you still do not have to increase that amount by one half until you do. 

 

The 3rd sign of danger is a headache. This would indicate you are heading for heat exhaustion. Drink water a few sips at a time until the headache starts to subside. Sitting in a cool area would help. A cold wet rag around the neck will help cool the blood supply to the brain. 

 

If the headache is coupled with dizziness or disorientation, stumbling incoherent or inability to talk then the person is going into heat stroke. 911 should be called immediately. Their life is in danger. After calling 911 loosen their clothes and get wet cold rags to put around their neck. Pour cool water on their head. Keep 911 on the phone and follow their instructions. If someone can get you ice send them to get it. Pack ice in their groin underarms and  around their head and neck. This will help bring their body temp down. Do not allow them to sit up or stand. Wait until the ambulance comes to move them. 

 

This may sound like scare tactics to some. However it is very easy to fall into danger if we do not take in enough cold water while dealing with the heat. 

 

I eat one banana at each break and one at lunch. This help replenish potassium levels. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are both very dangerous. THey can both be very dangerous and deadly. So be careful folks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reminders. I already had a heat thing. Scared the day lights out of me. I drink that water now. And respect how I feel. I used to be able to work hard in the heat. Push myself. Not now.

I know, inland, when in the ministry, the friends just keep the vehicles running from the time they get started, to when they are finished. Never turn them off. Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

First thing that we should be aware of is the need for our body to cool itself. It does this by sweating and the evaporation of the sweat.

 

I rarely perspire, however I get all the symptoms of heat exhaustion. I can barely tolerate the heat and if I go in the sun I get sick almost immediately. I carry water with me or we have to stop to get it. This is good information, thanks Gregory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always carried a bottle of water with me when I was a pioneer during the hot summer months.  Sometimes did not go out in the afternoon because I could not stand the heat, waited til the evening when it was cooler.  Although good excuse to work the beach and get an ice cream.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is common for the temps to be in the upper 90's here in Florida - and the humidity makes it feel much worse.

 

I carry a cooler with ice and water as well as some other drinks in my truck for work. Heat is nothing to play around with.

 

At the RBC projects they have some sisters coming around on a regular basis with water and "cool wet towels" reminding the workers to stay hydrated.

 

We also keep the car running with the AC working for service.

 

Good reminders.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good ideas though I can imagine it gives you quite the fuel bill to do that. Here in Ontario we get humidity because of being surrounded by the great lakes. So we will get temperatures reaching into the high 90's with humidex hitting into 120 to 140 degrees. Couple that with smog and allergens that are in the air and it sure makes it hard to breath. 

 

We had one heat wave last year that set records going back 90 years. It was so hot constructions crews were starting at 5 am and quitting by 11 am to stay out of the high heat. Most small firms shut down for 2 weeks. Told everyone to take a vacation. Production was way down because of it. I heard of a few cases of guys passing out because of the heat. ITs very dangerous and can kill you faster than the cold weather can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, humidity make it feel like it is in the 100's.

 

For here, the 90+ temps start in April/May and last through Sept. July and August can bring actual temps of 100+ and a heat index much higher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  good reminders :) appreciate the tips, bro Dent!

 

 in our congregation (central Florida) most take a thermos full of ice water with us in ministry,
  we only work door-to-door til 10:30 May-Oct, take a cooling-off indoor break,
    then backcalls from running vehicle w/ a/c on if no shady area is available.
 
 many wear hats, sisters & brothers. sisters over 65 carry a parasol. the younger might take an umbrella.
   same thing yes but when you're over 65 you get to call it a parasol.   :whistling:

    

  these are also useful, the crystals help:

  http://polarbreezebandanas.com/collections/cooling-neckwraps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am in Texas and the summers are pretty brutal.

 

We drink lots of water, wear hats in the ministry or some sisters will carry umbrellas.  We usually will work for about 30 minutes at a time in the ministry, then get in the car and blast the air conditioning and drink some water.  Brothers do not wear their suit jackets in the ministry in the summer either.

 

I always pack small coolers with bottle water and ice packs for my family when we are in the ministry.  We often get separated in car groups, so we each have a small cooler we bring.

 

Usually we do not work door to door in the afternoon as it is just too hot, 105+ temps.  We do door to door in the morning, then the afternoon it's calls or business territory.

 

My son suffers from really bad migraines when he is in the sun too long.  So when he is playing football or baseball with his friends, I have to pack him a cooler with bottled water and gatorade and he has to drink it.  He gets dehydrated really fast and then the headaches start, as long as he drinks gatorade and water while playing sports, he usually does ok.

 

My husband job is outside, and he too drinks plenty of gatorade and water and he wears a hat in the summer at work.

Edited by ava
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eating Bananas will help replace potassium that is lost while sweating. I keep a couple pounds of them around all year long. They are a great iron booster too. 

 

  while this is true, many in Florida have given up bananas as they tend to attract mosquitos,

   and with a 'winter' low around 50 degrees, they are in full force nearly year round.

    it's brutal in the ministry.

 

 people who live in Florida and whose interests include hiking, biking, fishing, camping etc

  will tell you that avoiding bananas makes a difference in repelling the pests. 

    I tried it. Huge difference. for myself and my Jack Russell too.

     instead I opt for the potassium pill.

 

  :)  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since a great majority of us will be Aux. Pioneering this coming August, which by the way, is usually the hottest month of the summer, going out in the morning, I found that by putting a white or some colored kitchen towel under the water and ringing it out, I put it into the freezer the night before I go out.  In the morning I put it into my cooler, along with 2 frozen bottles of the (small) waters, and 2 cold waters, and head out.  I always bring the bag with me, in case I wind up in other friends cars.  It really comes in handy when your in driving territory or (for me) short walking territories.   I place the cold towel around my neck and it stays pretty cold to cool by the time I do about 2 or 3 hours of service.  Sometimes if am able to stay out later, I bring two kitchen towels frozen in my cooler.  I don't sweat that much, and if I do around my forehead, I just wipe it with the cool towel.  Householders see this and they tell you "hey that's a good idea."  Look all of you, I keep hydrated.  Water is the best, but I noticed Zola Coconut Water is just as good.  And too, I eat a small lunch, nothing heavy.  Light meals are nice when its HOT outside.  Just my two cents! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

About JWTalk.net - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

Since 2006, JWTalk has proved to be a well-moderated online community for real Jehovah's Witnesses on the web. However, our community is not an official website of Jehovah's Witnesses. It is not endorsed, sponsored, or maintained by any legal entity used by Jehovah's Witnesses. We are a pro-JW community maintained by brothers and sisters around the world. We expect all community members to be active publishers in their congregations, therefore, please do not apply for membership if you are not currently one of Jehovah's Witnesses.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

JWTalk 22.5.22 (changelog)