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Witchety Grubs and Bush Tucker


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50099=2493-grub.GIF Witchetty grub From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A couple of witchetty grubs. The witchetty grub (also spelled witchety grub or witjuti grub[1]) is a term used in Australia for the large, white, wood-eating larvae of several moths. Particularly it applies to the larva of the cossid moth Endoxyla leucomochla, which feeds on the roots of the Witchetty bush (named after the grubs) that is found in central Australia.[2] The term may also apply to larvae of other cossid moths, ghost moths (Hepialidae), and longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae). The term is used mainly when the larvae are being considered as food. The grub is the most important insect food of the desert and was[when?] a staple in the diets of Aboriginal women and children.[3] The different larvae are said to taste similar, probably because they have similar wood-eating habits. Edible either raw or lightly cooked in hot ashes, they are sought out as a high-protein food by Indigenous Australians. The raw witchetty grub tastes like almonds and when cooked the skin becomes crisp like roast chicken while the inside becomes light yellow, like a fried egg.[3] The word witchetty comes from Adynyamathanha wityu, "hooked stick" and vartu, "grub." Traditionally it is rare for men to dig for them.[3] Witchetty grubs feature as Dreamings in many Aboriginal paintings. In Patrick White's novel, Riders in the Chariot, a young Aboriginal boy thinks a flabby rector looks like he was "made out of old wichetty grubs" (pg. 366 in Avon Press 1975 reprint of 1961 novel). Once caught the grubs leak a brown water juice over fingers when held.[3] These larvae may also be called Bardi grubs, also spelled Bardy grubs, especially when they are being considered as bait by freshwater fishermen. The term bardi grub appears to have originally been used for larvae of the longhorn beetle (Bardistus cibarius), but fisherman along the Murray River more often apply the term to the hepialid moth larvae of Trictena[4] and Abantiades.[5][citation needed] These grubs live about 60 cm below ground and feed upon the roots of River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). They can also be found under Black Wattle trees, and are attributed as the reason why wattles die within 10 to 15 years.[citation needed] The roots of the Acacia kempeana shrub are another source of the grubs.

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

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We're about to camping with a traditional Aboriginal family. Is there any guidence on eating things such as witchety grubs? Presumably if we catch a goanna we would have to cut its throat' date=' break its neck and drain it, but for how long? Any advice?[/quote'] I would drain it till only the bones are visible cause I ain't goanna eat that goanna no matter what. I don't care if they do taste like chicken. The witchety grubs on the other hand, just warmed on the barbi, with a little dark chocolate and choped nuts. Yum !

50132=2507-BigGrin.gif

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Is this yours and Musky's Sunday lunch very often :eat:
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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Is this yours and Musky's Sunday lunch very often :eat:
Maybe.............I think maybe Musky's not mine. My youngest son, when he was about 10, decided that if he was going to have to go hungry during the GT he was going to try an earthworm. So out in the garden he went and dug up a big earthworm. Squeezed it until all the guts came out, gave it a wash, a little salt and pepper, and ate it. When he was done being sick, he said he would rather go hungry.

50135=2508-apple_worm.gif

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Is this yours and Musky's Sunday lunch very often :eat:
Hee, hee, ya--with a nice chilled glass of chardonnay! LOL............just kiddin'! don't believe a word of this!

50172=2515-tasmanian-fork.jpg

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Is this yours and Musky's Sunday lunch very often :eat:
Maybe.............I think maybe Musky's not mine. My youngest son' date=' when he was about 10, decided that if he was going to have to go hungry during the GT he was going to try an earthworm. So out in the garden he went and dug up a big earthworm. Squeezed it until all the guts came out, gave it a wash, a little salt and pepper, and ate it. When he was done being sick, he said he would rather go hungry.

50135=2508-apple_worm.gif [/quote'] Don't know if my sandwich will stay down now.....:shutup:.....bad timing on my part to be eating lunch at this time....LOL

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Flame roasted Goanna You can catch the goanna in trees or on the ground. When they're in trees you throw a stick at them. If they're in the ground you might have to dig it out of the ground. If you want to cook the Goanna throw it on to burning flames to singe the skin. Cook them in ashes (put them over the ashes). If it is pregnant lay it on its belly so the eggs do not burst. For more Goanna recipes: http://outbackcooking.blogspot.com/2009/05/goanna-recipes.html And my own personal favorite: Goanna Cutlets Ingredients 1/2 Goanna 1 lemon 1 oz. flour Anchovy sauce 1 oz. flour Egg and breadcrumbs Frying fat 1 gill milk or water parsley 2 tablespoons cream 1 hard boiled egg Salt and cayenne Method Cut Goanna into small pieces, and add soft part of head, melt butter in small saucepan, stir in flour, and cook well. Add milk or water and stir till boiling. Add cream, salt, cayenne, 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice, anchovy sauce, and Goanna. Place on a plate and allow to become cold. Take a small portion, place on floured board and make into a cutlet shape with a knife. Dip into beaten egg and then into breadcrumbs, wet dry, then drain. Place a small piece of claw into end of each cutlet then serve garnished with slices of lemon, sprigs of parsley, and chopped egg. Yummie.

50219=2526-cooking_450g.gif

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This is a goanna.

50101=2494-Gonna.jpg That's interesting. I would imagine you would bleed it as you would any other animal. Not sure if I could eat either items on your menu. But who know's what we'll eat if we're hungry. Advice? Bring your salt and pepper shaker and some lemon juice.:popcorn:

50130=2505-white_chicken_stay_cool.gif Tastes like chicken....LOL

Flame roasted Goanna You can catch the goanna in trees or on the ground. When they're in trees you throw a stick at them. If they're in the ground you might have to dig it out of the ground. If you want to cook the Goanna throw it on to burning flames to singe the skin. Cook them in ashes (put them over the ashes). If it is pregnant lay it on its belly so the eggs do not burst. For more Goanna recipes: http://outbackcooking.blogspot.com/2009/05/goanna-recipes.html And my own personal favorite: Goanna Cutlets Ingredients 1/2 Goanna 1 lemon 1 oz. flour Anchovy sauce 1 oz. flour Egg and breadcrumbs Frying fat 1 gill milk or water parsley 2 tablespoons cream 1 hard boiled egg Salt and cayenne Method Cut Goanna into small pieces' date=' and add soft part of head, melt butter in small saucepan, stir in flour, and cook well. Add milk or water and stir till boiling. Add cream, salt, cayenne, 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice, anchovy sauce, and Goanna. Place on a plate and allow to become cold. Take a small portion, place on floured board and make into a cutlet shape with a knife. Dip into beaten egg and then into breadcrumbs, wet dry, then drain. Place a small piece of claw into end of each cutlet then serve garnished with slices of lemon, sprigs of parsley, and chopped egg. Yummie.[/quote'] ok, so now I'm totally grossed out---esp. the part about a 'pregnant goanna'....poor thing...

50220=2527-cow_cry.gif

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I'll take one Vernalee! Just one request' date=' we have more Slugs than grub, so could you include a recipe for them. They are so plentiful here.[/size']

50232=2529-IMG_3893.jpg

This recipe came from the kitchen of the Tilford Family handed down from a generation of scavengers. For delicious Slug Cutlets, substute Cleaned and Dressed Slugs for Goanna and eliminate the Anchovy Sauce Cook as directed. :bouncing:
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Thanks for downloading that information.

I was kind of leaning towards the validity of eating the grub. There is nothing in the scriptures that says we shouldn't is there?

We are deliberately taking this trip to learn about bush tucker. I will DEFINITELY post pictures when we return.

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Thanks for downloading that information.

I was kind of leaning towards the validity of eating the grub. There is nothing in the scriptures that says we shouldn't is there?

We are deliberately taking this trip to learn about bush tucker. I will DEFINITELY post pictures when we return.

I wish I could go with you, seriously post pictures. Don't use my recipes, I'm a terrible cook.:tsk:

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