Jump to content
JWTalk - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

What kind of emotion does the word 'govern' conjure up in English-speaking people?


We lock topics that are over 365 days old, and the last reply made in this topic was 1153 days ago. If you want to discuss this subject, we prefer that you start a new topic.

Recommended Posts

I ask this because recently there have been some changes to the Korean translation of two English JW terms.

One is the governing body and the other is shepherding. 

In the past, we used a Korean word that means exactly the same as govern but that word also sounds like 'control, manipulation and ruling.' 

So I guess the Korean branch decided not to use it and now they translate it into a term that could translate as 'the body of central elders.' pretty much the same as how Chinese NWT put it.

 

Another thing is shepherding. 

When translated in Korean, it sounds like 'to strike sheep.' 

In Korean, 'striking sheep' is one word that means shepherding in English.


We know what it 'means', but the emotion or the feeling it arouses is negative.

So Korean JWs always joke about how it's time for you to be stricken by now by elders. 

Now they translate it as 'take care of the flock of God.'

 

 

I guess this wasn't what was meant by FDS but anyway we all know what it really means so it didn't matter much.

I guess if anyone can read fluently both Biblical Hebrew and Koine, then he would have fun comparing NWT and the original Bibles. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ask this because recently there have been some changes to the Korean translation of two English JW terms.
One is the governing body and the other is shepherding. 
In the past, we used a Korean word that means exactly the same as govern but that word also sounds like 'control, manipulation and ruling.' 
So I guess the Korean branch decided not to use it and now they translate it into a term that could translate as 'the body of central elders.' pretty much the same as how Chinese NWT put it.
 
Another thing is shepherding. 
When translated in Korean, it sounds like 'to strike sheep.' 
In Korean, 'striking sheep' is one word that means shepherding in English.

We know what it 'means', but the emotion or the feeling it arouses is negative.
So Korean JWs always joke about how it's time for you to be stricken by now by elders. 
Now they translate it as 'take care of the flock of God.'
 
 
I guess this wasn't what was meant by FDS but anyway we all know what it really means so it didn't matter much.
I guess if anyone can read fluently both Biblical Hebrew and Koine, then he would have fun comparing NWT and the original Bibles. 
 

Sometimes when you translate a word or expression directly, it can become muddled in the goal language. For this reason, the translators have been taught to translate thoughts and ideas so that the same idea can be conveyed in the goal language. The result is a translation that is easier to take to your heart - one where the word of God becomes clearer to the reader.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Br. Timothy, can you please post the old and new Korean terms on here? 

 

When I hear the word "govern" in English, I think first of commercial or political organisations. There is nothing negative or positive about it to me, meaning just the act of showing leadership in a particular way. 

 

In Russian, the governing body literally means "the council of those who lead by the hand".  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, NobleEndeavours said:

I guess this wasn't what was meant by FDS but anyway we all know what it really means so it didn't matter much.

I guess if anyone can read fluently both Biblical Hebrew and Koine, then he would have fun comparing NWT and the original Bibles. 

Much the opposite, that's actually the point of a good translation: not to translate words literally but to convey the ideas accurately. For example, "to shepherd" is not to hit sheep with a stick, it's taking care of the sheep, which is exactly what the new translation highlights.

 

Another example: Jesus taught us to pray "Give us today our bread for this day". That expression makes perfect sense in a Western land where bread is the main staple food and people eat it every day. But probably it doesn't make much sense in an Asian country where the staple is rice and many people maybe don't even know what bread is. So the NWT into Asian languages usually renders Jesus' prayer as "Give us today our food for this day". That's a perfect translation, even if it's less literal, because it conveys accurately what Jesus meant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Bek said:

Br. Timothy, can you please post the old and new Korean terms on here? 

 

When I hear the word "govern" in English, I think first of commercial or political organisations. There is nothing negative or positive about it to me, meaning just the act of showing leadership in a particular way. 

 

In Russian, the governing body literally means "the council of those who lead by the hand".  :)

Sure!! : - )

Before it was '통치체'. In Chinese characters would be '统治体‘. 

Many Korean words are borrowed words from Chinese so basically, only the alphabets and the pronunciations (and also the grammar) differ, Japanese more so. 

So 통치체 is composed of '통치' + '체'.

통치 literally means 'to govern, to rule.' and 체 means body.

Now it's '중앙장로회', which simply means 'the congregation of the central elders.' 

중앙-central,centre

장로-elder

회-congregation, meeting.

'Center elder congregation.'

 

Before it was '양치는 방문.' 

양치는 ='sheep-hitting'

방문 ='call, visit.'

 

Now it's '양떼를 돌보다.'

양떼 = the flock of sheep

돌보다 = to take care, to shepherd...

 

By the way, the Russian translation is also very impressive. It makes me think it's really taking care of us. 

Edited by NobleEndeavours
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never thought the term "Governing Body" was really appropriate, as it might give the impression the GB serve as a "government" for Jehovah's Witnesses. We speak about a new "world government," and so some might think our GB would think that they form that government. Of course, they will serve as part of the Kingdom government once they're all resurrected to heavenly life. But the term could give the idea that they would be that government while still on earth.

 

Then I learned French. In French (and maybe it's similar in some other languages) we use the term "collège central" (central body). To me it doesn't sound like it could be taken the wrong way.

 

Lots of terms in French make more sense to me. Instead of "regular pioneer," we say "pionnier permanent" (permanent pioneer).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

About JWTalk.net - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

Since 2006, JWTalk has proved to be a well-moderated online community for real Jehovah's Witnesses on the web. However, our community is not an official website of Jehovah's Witnesses. It is not endorsed, sponsored, or maintained by any legal entity used by Jehovah's Witnesses. We are a pro-JW community maintained by brothers and sisters around the world. We expect all community members to be active publishers in their congregations, therefore, please do not apply for membership if you are not currently one of Jehovah's Witnesses.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

JWTalk 22.1.2 (changelog)