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Ferb

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About Ferb

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    Brother
  • First Name
    David
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    Britain
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  1. A sister in my hall with that haircut too. But she's 5, so it doesn't seem so unusual
  2. Katty

    :boating::boating::wub::wub:

  3. Yes, it's not surprising at all. If I weren't a witness, I'd probably make a lot more money. (Not definitely - but assuming there are various other witnesses like me, 'probably' is all it has to be to explain the statistical difference.) Without the guidance from God, I'd take instead the guidance from the world, that a career is the way to improve my life. And there have certainly been opportunities to strive for a career - after college, I had the grades to apply to a top university, but pioneered instead. Even more lately, I've noted the possibility of getting a higher degree, but thought it would just take up too much time from other things. Servants of God have other priorities than making money. The surprising thing is how high that '>$100,000' part is among witnesses, even though it's considerably lower than any other religion! I've known a few witnesses who make a lot, often from businesses or careers they'd built up before coming into the truth, but I can't think of more than one in the same congregation anywhere, so I wouldn't expect it to be as high as 4%.
  4. When quoting that a man had already been awarded compensation because it might have contributed to his cancer, they don't mention that that guy was constantly working with the chemical, not just eating trace amounts of it in food. And I think they quoted the WHO in 2015 saying that it was 'probably carcinogenic to humans', but strangely didn't quote them a year later saying that while there was "some evidence of a positive association between glyphosate exposure and risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma" in some studies, the only large study of high quality found "no evidence of an association at any exposure level". https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-45155788
  5. There's a five-minute game (I don't know if it should be called a game actually, you can't exactly win or lose) showing other possible results of this. It only seems to work with a mouse though, not a touchscreen. https://ncase.itch.io/wbwwb
  6. I've only seen the trailer, but that was definitely the impression I got from it. "Philosophy Lecturer : I would like to bypass senseless debate altogether and jump to the conclusion every sophomore's already aware of, there is no God." You're a philosophy lecturer, it's your job to debate things however much you think everybody's already aware of them, like whether reality actually exists or not, or whether we have to feel feelings, or whether anybody besides yourself is actually a real person or just an illusion! If you don't want to debate things you think everybody already knows, you can't teach a philosophy class! The plot just seems so unbelievable at that basic premise. If they'd made it some other kind of lecturer - but a philosophy lecturer I can't imagine making such a statement. He would basically be announcing that he's incapable of doing his job.
  7. Not really. This is an article from 2014. I forget what it was that year. The Hezekiah one, maybe? But I remember seeing that article before and thinking anyone could see that it said more about the person writing it than it did about us. He'd thrown water at random people in the past. He finds classical music 'eerie'. Anybody wearing a suit or a nice dress - basically anything smarter than jeans - 'looks like they're going to a wake'. And being organized is 'creepy'. I think any mature person would recognize that these are the ways the deadbeat class bully refers to the kid who is doing well, to feel better about themselves!
  8. Yeah, but you've got The Princess Bride on your mind because I mentioned it the other day when talking about the Digging item and the study note for Luke 13:33. I'd have to throw some Pixar in there, Inside Out maybe, or The Incredibles. I really like Mr. Peabody and Sherman, and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Meet the Robinsons - films about misunderstood geniuses generally, I guess. And Mary and Max, which I suppose is a toned down more realistic view of the same sort of plot, though with some dark humour. I always like the bit where Max's air conditioning unit falls out of the wall and crushes a mime (who keeps miming actions like walking as if he would be getting out of the way of the falling weight, but never does). The narrator says, "Luckily, his manslaughter charges were dismissed because he was declared mentally incompetent and unlikely to have a motive for killing a mime artist... unlike most people."
  9. Ferb

    Mormons lgbt

    But who can be said to have the proper understanding of the issues? Suppose your child had killed someone in the past, and felt guilty over that, to the point of feeling suicidal. It's reasonable to want to "turn to someone who has the proper understanding of the issues". But if someone were going to encourage them that they shouldn't feel suicidal because they have nothing to feel guilty about because having killed people in the past, if they did it as a soldier serving their country, is something they should feel proud of? Such a psychologist may be well qualified from a secular point of view, but their understanding of the issues is laughably uninformed from God's point of view. The creator of the human brain would probably say that the average servant of his, despite maybe having no qualifications in the subject, understands things about these issues that the professional does not. So is some psychologist necessarily a better person to turn to in that particular situation?
  10. I started off learning BASIC on my ZX Spectrum 48k when I was 4 or 5 years old. (The 'peek and poke around' joke earlier mainly makes me think of that - the buttons on the keyboard had all the commands on, so I knew them all even if I didn't know how to use them. I'd know how to use them all know of course, but lots of them were constantly calling out to be explored at that age.) I didn't like the hard keyboard when I got a 128k as a replacement - I felt keys should be made of rubber! I programmed on my Dad's TRS-80 model IV as well, and the 128k spectrum had a great 'PLAY' command from which I learned (via the manual) evefything I knew about music for the first few decades of my life. When I got an Amiga A1200 I learned AMOS, which was like BASIC but which more graphical capabilities for making games, and we enjoyed playing around with that. Once I got a PC, we soon got Borland C++ on a magazine cover CD and learned to make text programs with that, but making anything Windows based or graphical was more difficult - I managed a bit of it, but it felt like a step back from what we'd been able to accomplish in the past. At some point we got Blitz Basic, Dark Basic and Visual Basic which were more what I was used to, and made the games at anastasei.co.uk back in my teens, and then started learning C#, though it was years later that I also discovered Unity and was able to make an Android game with that, Hamsterball Sports, thoguh I don't know if that's available anymore since I got tired of Google asking for more forms to be filled in every few months without really getting anything from them in return. I know at some point I learned python as well, but I didn't like it, and I learned the basics of html, css, and javascript - enough to fiddle around with a webpage. And at this point, any C-like language usually is fairly quick to pick up. I'm familiar with assembler - I haven't written in it, but I can read disassembled code when occassionally useful.
  11. Here in Britain we've had some severe weather warnings this week because the temperatures were in the high twenties. Hey, we're not used to it like the rest of you!
  12. 1.Genesis 2. Bible Teach Book 3. Israel 4. I'm not interested 5. David/Esther 6. Matthew
  13. Just worth noting that, if you're going to the door, it's usually recognized that you aren't trespassing, regardless of 'do not trespass' signs. "In reaching this conclusion, the court took an exhaustive look at well over twenty appellate court decisions. The court recognized that a number of courts have held that the posting of no trespassing signs has the effect of rescinding the invitation to the public to approach one’s front door without a specific invitation. However, the court noted that a much larger number of cases have held to the contrary. More importantly, the court found these latter cases better reasoned than the former group of cases." - https://www.radford.edu/content/cj-bulletin/home/june--2017--vol-2--no--2-/do-_no-trespassing-signs-rescind-the-invitation-to-the-public-to.html That's just a random response to a Google search, maybe elders have given you information more specially relevant to your country or state, but since this forum is read by brothers everywhere, I thought it should be noted that 'do not trespass' signs are usually of no consequence, because the legal view in most places is that a path to the front door constitutes an implicit invitation to members of the public. To start camping in the garden or parking your car on their drive may be trespassing, but walking to their front door isn't - not here anyway (we were told that at pioneer school, for one thing).
  14. I've mainly played Civilization IV - I have Civ III and Civ V too (I got them all in a bundle) but haven't played them. I've been so busy lately I don't see myself playing any long games like that for a while!
  15. I can read music. That doesn't necessarily mean I can sing to the notes, my voice isn't that well trained, but I have a reasonable understanding of theory, of notes, keys and chords, if it's helpful for devising a harmony or anything.
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JWTalk 18.9.15 by Robert Angle (changelog)