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Timeless Treasures Behind Chalkboard


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I have never seen this before. It is quite intriguing. I would love to see how the multiplication wheel was used in 1917. (It was 1917, wasn't it?)  Teachers back then must have had less discipline problems than now.

http://www.quora.com/How-does-the-multiplication-wheel-that-was-discovered-on-old-chalkboards-at-Emerson-High-School-in-Oklahoma-work         Some interesting theories, but it seems this was a drill in which the students were called on and the outer numbers were in random order, so that the students couldn't pre-calculate their problem. Although this was a high school, there were obviously elementary classes in the building. In Middle School, our dreaded Social Studies Teacher called on us in "random order."  I quickly noticed that I was called on twice after Catherine Lewis,so he must have made a designated "random list."  After that, every time he called on Cathy I did not listen to her answer, but prepared the following book question to be delivered orally. That was his line-up.I didn't fall in love with History until I started studying the Bible, especially Daniel Chapter 5.  

p.s. I think the Smart Boards are a waste of money in most class situations. Any computer with a projector will get the material delivered (imho)

Edited by kejedo
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I think kids were always kids, so there was always discipline problems...lol just not the same ones. Think of Gilbert Blythe in Anne of Green Gables, oh believe me my grandmother grew up in the 1920s and boy does she have stories of the things her siblings did in school. I used to think she just told tales on them, and would always say she was so good, the teacher always used her as the good example... I thought she was cherry picking her stories to us... but when I met her school mates they confirmed her stories... most of them were honery hooligans! lol haha And she was one of the few well behaved ones. lol 

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I was so impressed by the writing or penmanship (I don't think they call it that anymore?). It was meticulously written. Kids don't write like that anymore, actually maybe they can't really write at all with all the texting they do :(.

Anyway, that was very interesting.

Edited by Luezette
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I was so impressed by the writing or penmanship (I don't think they call it that anymore?). It was meticulously written. Kids don't write like that anymore, actually maybe they can't really write at all with all the texting they do :(.

Anyway, that was very interesting.

Many schools no longer teach handwriting. It is not in the Common Core Standards.

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It is still called penmanship, I homeschool and there is many penmanship curriculas out there... I buy them!!! But, Pauline is right, many public schools have taken out penmanship! Which is different then writing (writing is about like making up stories and such)... but we have focused on penmanship for years. You can't leave a text at a door, when you visit a RV who isn't home.

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You're right. Penmanship is different from writing per se. I remember having actual penmanship books/lessons, either print or cursive. There were lines in the books where you had to keep the letters within the lines. Oh the days! :).

Actually now that I think about it as I'm writing (typing, lol) this, there are penmanship books sold on the streets for one dollar. And there's a Teacher Parent store in downtown Brooklyn. I'll be close to the area tomorrow or today even. I might stop in to see what they have.

And as a side note, that store used to be called just a Teacher's store. But I guess because so many parents were using it, they decided to change it to "Teacher Parent" store. I was one of those parents, either there or Barnes Noble book store. Never trust this system's education system to teach your children everything they need to know even secularly. I used to give my children work in addition to what their teachers gave them. Yep, it made them angry at me but it paid off!

Edited by Luezette
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It is a nice find .... but, as for preserving it, I doubt it will survive the GT so even if it does get erased :eek: it won't really matter a thousand years from now

It absolutely will not make a diff a thousand years for now, but for those who are bobbing and weaving their way through this treacherous system and trying to provide their children with a measure of vocational and practical education (for the present), this is interesting. Also for those who have worked and/or still work in the realm of public or private "education," it is informative and somewhat surprising. Many of our day to day meanderings in this system will have little carry-over 1000 years from now. Thanks, it is good for us to keep that perspective in mind.  :bible2:

Edited by kejedo
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I actually use a lot of books from that era, because I think the quality of education people received was so much better. One way this translates to our day, and being witnesses. 1) many no longer write, as witnesses we still have many times when we NEED to be able to have good legible penmanship. 2) Back in the day when these chalk boards were being used. Very very few adults went on to higher education. Yet, they were for the most part able to provide for themselves and their children after schooling, many of which only went to the 9th grade! (that was often the highest grade available in the local public schools). Yet, they seemed to be better educated with their 9th grade educations, then many with 2 or more years of higher education today. Something to think about when choosing education for our children, and trying to steer away from too much higher education distracting from serving Jehovah.

Edited by PrairieGirl
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I actually use a lot of books from that era, because I think the quality of education people received was so much better. One way this translates to our day, and being witnesses. 1) many no longer write, as witnesses we still have many times when we NEED to be able to have good legible penmanship. 2) Back in the day when these chalk boards were being used. Very very few adults went on to higher education. Yet, they were for the most part able to provide for themselves and their children after schooling, many of which only went to the 9th grade! (that was often the highest grade available in the local public schools). Yet, they seemed to be better educated with their 9th grade educations, then many with 2 or more years of higher education today. Something to think about when choosing education for our children, and trying to steer away from too much higher education distracting from serving Jehovah.

Many 4 yr degree prgmgs have pushed down qualified HS candidates. The beat goes on.  Sadly,It is not about capability. 

Edited by kejedo
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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow! 

 

I appreciate those links! I think that is so cool.  I never saw that before - I know of a sister

that owns her own charter school would absolutely love this!

Still today I have a picture of my 8th grade award in penmanship! 

Someone inquired if I attended Catholic School.  No regular public school

but I recently stop writing in that manner for signing any documents for 

fear that someone could easily duplicate my writing style! 

 

So now I write like physician when signing documents!  LOL

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Wow! 

 

I appreciate those links! I think that is so cool.  I never saw that before - I know of a sister

that owns her own charter school would absolutely love this!

Still today I have a picture of my 8th grade award in penmanship! 

Someone inquired if I attended Catholic School.  No regular public school

but I recently stop writing in that manner for signing any documents for 

fear that someone could easily duplicate my writing style! 

 

So now I write like physician when signing documents!  LOL

I had to print on my class room boards, b/c high school students did not understand or write cursive.

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It has Richard... they haven't taught it in our local schools for over 20 years. my nieces and nephews can not read it! 

 

It's a way of way dumbing down society.. they can not even read original documents that founded America. Not that we are political by any means, but if you want to know your rights, you need to be able to read and understand the laws! Which is how the society has gained so many freedoms for us. And people used to think that America would not truly be touched like the rest of the world when it came to the end times... some how we would be better off. HA, and double HA! I remember hearing those theories growing up and thinking... wow that's pretty conceited thinking, that Jehovah would have more favor on Americans and not let Satan touch it as harshly as other nations... It's all going down... US included.. and you can see the clearly stupid choices that education takes, it will not be hard to bamboozle the average citizen, and as the saying goes, it will go to hell in a hand basket soon! lol haha (figurative hell of course! lol)

 

All that being said my FAVORITE font is Wendy! It's cursive. I use it on all my blog graphics. ;) It's what I have used for my blog graphics for the past about 12 or so years. :)

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Interesting reading the stories about using the older school books to teach our kids.

My sister was informed when her daughter was in kdgtn, that Sarah would not pass into first grade because her reading skills, were not up to that teacher's standards. I took myself to the library, did some research, and checked out a book, titled, "Why Johnny can't read." Her Mom worked with Sarah for about 3 weeks, and the child just blossomed, with her new skill. Even a child at the tender age of 5, can realize they are being singled out.

Sarah passed into first grade, listening to her mother say, "Sarah", put that book down, and do your homework.

One little tidbit that I have used, effectively with children who are being tutored in reading, is to make them realize that all those letters are a code, hiding treasures. Those treasures are amazing stories about things you've never heard of. And what child doesn't like a treasure hunt?

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