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'Parmesan'


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Did you know that in Italy, only cheese coming from the provinces of Parma, Reggio Emilia, Bologna (only the area to the west of the river Reno), Modena (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantua (in Lombardy, but only the area to the south of river Po), Italy, are allowed to be called Parmesan (which is a nickname - more correctly, Parmigiano-Reggiano). In, for example, the US, any cheese similar to that one can be called Parmesan. The Italian Parmigiano-Reggiano is surrounded by several rules and quality checks. It is ages at least 12 months, and is made from a mix of skim and whole milk. Is your Parmesan really a Parmigiano-Reggiano?

Talk of Tomatoes

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I love cellulose then! I put that stuff on everything, even my popcorn!

Then you should try the real thing. Or, for a softer taste, some Grana Padano, another DOP (PDO)-protected hard cheese. Or, if you like some really intense taste, why not the 30 months variety of Parmigiano-Reggiano.
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I definitely have tried the real thing, I just can't afford it for as much as I use it. 

Isn't it sad to substitute it with cellulose? Why not have a little less but of better quality and perhaps better taste? That's what I try to do when it comes to food.
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Love Parmesan too, usually get it in a wedge but I can't eat it fast enough and it goes hard.

If you grate it, you could freeze it. Don't worry if it goes a bit hard, it just means that the humidity in your fridge isn't really perfect. Solve by wrapping it in food-grade plastic. Or ask your cheese vendor person to cut you a smaller slice.
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good idea about grating a part of it when I buy it, but it does taste different when it's grated fresh as opposed freezing. 

If you ask me, it's not noticeable, if the intention is to use it to melt over food. One suggestion, if you want to keep a piece of Parmesan for a very long time in your fridge (maybe a year or so), then you should wrap it in some paper and then food grade plastic on top of that. Do not keep it in a plastic jar, since that does no good for the humidity.
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5 hours ago, Thesauron said:

 

Did you know that in Italy, only cheese coming from the provinces of Parma, Reggio Emilia, Bologna (only the area to the west of the river Reno), Modena (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantua (in Lombardy, but only the area to the south of river Po), Italy, are allowed to be called Parmesan (which is a nickname - more correctly, Parmigiano-Reggiano). In, for example, the US, any cheese similar to that one can be called Parmesan. The Italian Parmigiano-Reggiano is surrounded by several rules and quality checks. It is ages at least 12 months, and is made from a mix of skim and whole milk. Is your Parmesan really a Parmigiano-Reggiano?

Talk of Tomatoes

New York Daily News

 

 

Actually, YES, I did know that. It is often mentioned on several shows on Food Network.

 

In keeping with that:

 

  • Only sweet onions grown around Vidalia, Ga can legally be called a "Vidalia Onion" - all others as just "sweet onions"
  • Idaho Potatoes can only be labeled that if they are grown in the US state of Idaho - if they are grown elsewhere they are "Russets" or "US #1"
  • Scotch Whisky must be brewed in Scotland - to be properly called "Scotch Whisky" there are some very strict laws/rules that regulate the labeling.

I'm sure if we really look, there are many foods, as well as other things, that technically should come from a certain place or region to have the name that is given to them.

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  • Scotch Whisky must be brewed in Scotland - to be properly called "Scotch Whisky" there are some very strict laws/rules that regulate the labeling.
  • I'm sure if we really look, there are many foods, as well as other things, that technically should come from a certain place or region to have the name that is given to them.

    Sometimes it doesn't really matter, except it's false marketing and you are lying to your customers, deceiving them. But every now and then it really does matter. The heavily controlled Parmigiano-Reggiano really does differ from the not so controlled generic brands.

    Did you know that you can, in fact, mix E150a into your whisky and still call it scotch? It's generally considered safe, but it's still interesting.
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    • 1 month later...
    On 9/24/2016 at 6:10 PM, Qapla said:
    • I'm sure if we really look, there are many foods, as well as other things, that technically should come from a certain place or region to have the name that is given to them.

     

    Very interesting John!  So what region of France do French fries come from?  :coffee:

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    Very interesting John!  So what region of France do French fries come from?  :coffee:

    It's a bit misleading that Americans call them French when in fact they are Belgian, probably from the Meuse Valley. However, it is very popular, even in France, to eat them with cooked mussels. But in one way it was correct for Americans to call them 'French' back in the day. During WWI, when American troops first 'discovered' this type of food, the army that ate them (the Belgian one) had French as their official language. So, French fries it became. The brits call them chips. The French call them 'pomme de terre frites' or, simply 'frites'.


    ____
    "Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also."—Matthew 6:21.
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    On ‎9‎/‎24‎/‎2016 at 6:10 PM, Qapla said:

     

    • Only sweet onions grown around Vidalia, Ga can legally be called a "Vidalia Onion" - all others as just "sweet onions"

    This reminds me of a hilarious blog I recently read:  https://conjuringreality.com/2016/10/13/dont-try-recipe-broiled-vidalia-onions/ 

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