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I'v just been working on a little something to understand the mind, will, emotions and so on. What I have so far. 

 

598909596332b_TheSelf3.jpg.5397b791992df5975d1252faccc830a1.jpg 

 

 

1. First comes the self, who we are, our very being and consciousness, being in the now and current reality in front of us.

 

2. Our second process is either a conscious thought, brought about by effort of the self. Thinking of a subject or image intentfully, whether it be in relation to the present and what is in front of us or otherwise. Or, a random thought may come about, not always connected to the current subject or reality in front of us. These are possibilities, associations, ideas of what we may be looking at (ie, an old lady by the stairs, we might have a random thought of her falling or even pushing her, regardless of the desire to or not), it may be a random subject that comes to mind, unrelated to the present. Either way we can pay heed to these random thoughts or we can ignore them. Agree or disagree and so on, this will be based upon largely of our emotions and logic.

 

3. Our likes and dislikes are forms from both our objective logic and emotions. 

 

2/3. Emotions whilst associated with what we like and dislike and are results from our thoughts (ELO - Emotional Logic Operation), sometimes can trigger without thought. We at times can be in a certain mood (ES - Emotional State) which then in turn triggers thoughts, either random or conscious. For example; "I don't know, I just feel down today". Or one may get random sad or anxious thoughts and/or images. 
 

Disorders such as anxiety or depression are chains of thoughts triggered by lingering emotions (ES) causing the habit of negative or anxious thinking which in result cycles it's self leading to more negative emotions (ESO leading to ES) and in turn more negative thoughts and so it continues. Vice versa is also possible if one tries hard to be positive, they may have more positive random thoughts and ideas, and will be less affected by the negative ones that come by.  

 

4. Likes/desires and dislikes/fears in themselves manifest

 

The real miracle here to our consciousness is the green, our being. Neuroscience is always arguing over free will. The real question for them is "is there a difference between random thought and conscious thought?" (This has actually been some what of an obsession of mine also, trying to understand the difference between "my will" and random thought, both of which come from the brain. It's amazing to me but also kind of frightening in that... I'm 'me' and I'm a law abiding person who does not act upon random evil thoughts that come into the mind. It feels scary sometimes that the glass between the lion inside us that would devour and who we become in reality is  but made up of our values and emotions and that makes us who we are...)

 

It's the hardest part to understand, of course free will and our decisions are more than just random fluctuations in the mind or else Jehovah could not judge us, neither could we judge each other. I wrote this in one of my blogs. I gave the example of computers (very similar in a fashion actually in how a scientists disproved the theory of a simulated reality.)

 

Model 1: A computer which only has one program; to kill an innocent individual.

 

Model 2: A computer has within it multiple programs of which are chosen at random. The program that randomly was chosen was a killing program, which resulted in the death of an innocent individual.

 

To judge and imprison model one is to put a computer in prison for only having a single program; to kill of which it cannot help. To judge model two is to put a computer in prison for having a set of programs which one of will be chosen at random, which resulted in someone’s death, which again it still could not help. They are both still computers. This is why computers, even with artificial intelligence, do not have true emotional or sentient capacity to judge each other or even the people who program them for their actions, nor do we judge the computers in turn for such. Yet we judge each other, which means we are ‘not’ programmed computers. For if we were, just like those computers we’d not even have the capacity to judge right or wrong actions or peoples.

 

As René Descartes would say; “I think, therefore I am”. 

 

When one takes away the concept or belief in the free will, then one finds themselves more prone to doing immoral acts as well as losing their emotions of love, appreciation, hate and disgust. (This has actually been conducted in several tests, where subjects were told they no longer had free will, but it was a lie, they all began to do immoral acts and vices they had been resisting all their lives, under the illusion that they had no free will. We can see how Satan would want to advocate such a philosophy. Again the removal of responsibility.)

 

The real one to scratch your head at is emotional influence. Sometimes we do things we regret because emotion can dictate us and overtake us. Sometimes it's only with prayer can we fight it. This is temptation, inherent sin.  "I find, then, this law in my case: that when I wish to do what is right,+ what is bad is present with me."  - Romans 7:21

 

Our imperfection makes is susceptible to such things, and thus Jehovah gives us repentance. 

 

But really, the main point here is that it's amazing how free will and the mind works. A two way relationship of determined things in the brain whilst also us having freedom of will to choose what 'we' want to do, in the way that all other higher beings of consciousness and self awareness do. Emotions also being of a very special quality, love and happiness not just being "drugs" that we are addicted to as scientists would claim, but they originate with the father, who is not at all a physical construct, but also experiences emotions in the same way. 

 

 

 

More on this subject on my blog; https://theuniverseofeccentricm.wordpress.com/2017/07/21/the-mind-and-self-far-more-than-just-organic-machines-and-bags-of-chemicals/ 

 

But thought I'd just write here about it too and share, but also for any other thoughts and input on the mind and what makes us what we are.

 


Edited by EccentricM
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I've read a few books about the mind-brain problem and have had a few brain scans as part of a study on autism. I've learned a lot about neuro psychiatry over the years.

 

A lot of research on depressive 'circular thinking' has been on the subject of the Default mode network and (if I recall correctly) either an overconnection between (or overactivity in) the prefrontal cortex (the 'thinking' part of the brain) and the amygdala (emotion centre/affective sensory area).

 

I also fine it interesting that the word "spirit" in the biblical sense is often described as an energizing force (similar to electricity in a circuit; absolutely vital, but still just an impersonal force) and in recent decades they've discovered that the brain and in fact our entire nervous system is quite literally a vast network of electrical circuits (neurons, or nerve cells).

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1 hour ago, Brandon said:

I've read a few books about the mind-brain problem and have had a few brain scans as part of a study on autism. I've learned a lot about neuro psychiatry over the years.

 

A lot of research on depressive 'circular thinking' has been on the subject of the Default mode network and (if I recall correctly) either an overconnection between (or overactivity in) the prefrontal cortex (the 'thinking' part of the brain) and the amygdala (emotion centre/affective sensory area).

 

 

 

Yes, I read about that as well. I am under going tests at the moment for Austism spectrum, but it seems unlikely as I have good social skills, empathy, self awareness and so on, but I do have many of the other behaviour symptoms, but they are also shared in dyspraxia (which my father is diagnosed with) and ADHD. I think that all these conditions are related, and we have just split them up for the sake of labels, but all could be a single condition or form of aliment affecting people in various ways as they all originate from the same areas of the brain. There are so many cross overs and really what you get diagnosed with is just a name attached to a specific group of symptoms together. 

 

These conditions tend to affect people who are more brainy in general I have noticed, as a cost for their smarts. And as you say it makes sense since it's "over activity in the thinking part of the brain".


Edited by EccentricM
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9 hours ago, EccentricM said:

I think that all these conditions are related, and we have just split them up for the sake of labels

You are right on the nose with that point!  In fact over the last century, psychiatrists' consensus has gone from broad labels, to breaking up patterns of symptoms, to grouping them back together, and breaking them up again!

 

Just four years ago they reunited Autism and Asperger's Syndrome for really the second time since Hans Asperger began his research about 80 years ago, under the label Autism Spectrum Disorder. This was when they completely revised the DSM for the first time in over 20 years.

 

Although the DSM is published by imperfect doctors using imperfect research, I think this fifth edition of the DSM has gone in the right direction at least with regards the definition of autism. It really just defines it using two criteria, and each individual with the disorder can vary with regards those two criteria:

 

1. Great preference for routine and repetition in daily living 

2. Difficulties in interpersonal relations 

 

each of the above is measured in the patient as to the severity of its presence, so a patient could have essentially no (or very little) social difficulties that are generally noticed be others (sometimes because they've learned at an early age what behaviours are expected and which are not), while ranking high on the first criteria for needing repetition and routine; often anxiety rises high when the person is unable to perform their preferred routine.

 

 

If it hadn't been for this update to the DSM in 2013, I almost certainly would not have been properly diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. I'm fact, I underwent psychological testing about ten years ago and was told I didn't "quite fit" the criteria at the time because I didn't have enough developmental deficits--but since 2013 they no longer need to strictly apply the "developmental disorder" category to autism.

 

Getting diagnosed has allowed me to get greater access to community and health resources, including a social group for people on the spectrum, which has helped me a great deal to see other real life examples of those on the spectrum and accept that I do in fact fit in this category.

 

The brain is in many ways still a mystery (that's why they call it the "black box," yet to be unlocked by researchers), but there is a concept neurodiversity. Perhaps you've heard of it in your reading?  It's well worth reading about.

 

P.S. There's a recent award winning book called NeuroTribes written by a long term follower of autism research and I also highly recommend taking that book out from the library. I also have a digital copy of it in ePub format. Feel free to PM me and I'll send it to anyone who wants to read it.

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7 hours ago, Brandon said:

 

 

1. Great preference for routine and repetition in daily living 

2. Difficulties in interpersonal relations 

For me I'm the exact opposite.  I have good interpersonal relationships, and I'm very random and unpredictable, not one for planning but rather "flying on the seat of my pants".  If you've ever looked  into Jungs or Myers Briggs psychology I am classed as an ENFP. 

 

 

 

Quote

neurodiversity.

I may or may not have heard of it. I'll have to look that up.

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Ah yes, looking it up, I am familiar. In fact I have heard of this spoken about in Jungian communities, as people have noticed certain MBTI personality types tend to develop certain disorders more commonly than others. ENFPs and ENTPs are most commonly diagnosed with ADHD for example, and INTPs  & INTJs with Autism, as the common personality/cognitive traits by these types are also listed as common symptoms of these conditions. The question remains whether these are not disorders but are neurodiverstiy, or if these disorders are creating that person's MBTI type. 

 

I personally think that it's neither. I think certain people with certain cognitive functions and traits will be more prone to developing certain conditions. That perhaps all these related conditions such as dyspraxia, autism, ADHD and so on are perhaps a singular disorder or sorts, and according to the individual's traits or cognitive type, different symptoms will come out, that their cognitive functions/traits are being "overcharged" ( over-activity in prefrontal cortex) creating these various symptoms of these conditions accordingly, but there is one core issue or trigger in the brain that is at play. 


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  • 2 weeks later...

https://aeon.co/essays/your-brain-does-not-process-information-and-it-is-not-a-computer

 

Found this cool article today. Goes to show just how much we still fail to understand. 

 

"10  I have seen the occupation that God has given to the sons of men to keep them occupied. 11  He has made everything beautiful in its time He has even put eternity in their heart; yet mankind will never find out the work that the true God has made from start to finish". - Ecclesiastes 3:10,11

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Don't usually read articles that give evolution the credit for creation, but this was an interesting take on how our

brains 'possibly' function.

This was especially deep:

Quote

Misleading headlines notwithstanding, no one really has the slightest idea how the brain changes after we have learned to sing a song or recite a poem. But neither the song nor the poem has been ‘stored’ in it. The brain has simply changed in an orderly way that now allows us to sing the song or recite the poem under certain conditions. When called on to perform, neither the song nor the poem is in any sense ‘retrieved’ from anywhere in the brain, any more than my finger movements are ‘retrieved’ when I tap my finger on my desk. We simply sing or recite – no retrieval necessary.

 

599e2e8a3b5d1_FASCINATINGSpock.gif.1c3d2a6d255bf99fddca0a76948efdfb.gif

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18 minutes ago, Friends just call me Ross said:

Don't usually read articles that give evolution the credit for creation, but this was an interesting take on how our

brains 'possibly' function.

 

 

 

Yeah I just tend to ignore the "evolution" part in articles and replace it with creation (or adaptation depending on the context.) But the rest is all good. I think studies like these serve well in supporting creation, since the mind is not something we can yet grasp, I'd say the reason being is because it's made in God's image. It's trying to grasp the very nature of consciousness which has always existed as it has always been a part of Jehovah. It's something infinite and non-tangible in nature, just like God's form. Jehovah created an organ that physically processes the intangible, which is why the brain is just so hard to 'get'. 


Edited by EccentricM
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11 hours ago, EccentricM said:

 

Yeah I just tend to ignore the "evolution" part in articles and replace it with creation (or adaptation depending on the context.) But the rest is all good. I think studies like these serve well in supporting creation, since the mind is not something we can yet grasp, I'd say the reason being is because it's made in God's image. It's trying to grasp the very nature of consciousness which has always existed as it has always been a part of Jehovah. It's something infinite and non-tangible in nature, just like God's form. Jehovah created an organ that physically processes the intangible, which is why the brain is just so hard to 'get'. 

 

Yeah, and he even slipped once and said "We are built to...".  

 

Being 'built' requires a 'builder'.^_^

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