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The hottest new beauty trend is your blood


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http://nypost.com/2016/11/15/the-hottest-new-beauty-trend-our-blood/

161115-beauty-trend-blood-feature.jpg

 

Determined to banish wrinkles and hyperpigmentation once and for all? Try smearing blood on your face.

German orthopedic doctor Barbara Sturm — known as the mother of the “vampire facial,” a treatment favored by boldfacers such as Kim Kardashian that involves spreading a layer of the patient’s plasma on the face, then using needles to inject it deeper into the skin — has created a $950 face cream called MC1, infused with proteins from each user’s blood.

The cream has won over celebrities and beauty editors alike. On beauty bible IntoTheGloss.com, editor Emily Ferber called the cream “the best thing I’ve ever put on my face.” Cher, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Jason Statham have all sung Sturm’s praises.


 But getting MC1 takes more than a trip to Sephora. Right now, you have to fly to Germany, to one of Sturm’s clinics in Düsseldorf or Munich — or, if she’s visiting your city and you’re on her list, meet her at a hotel room — where she’ll draw your blood, then whip it into a personalized cream.


Edited by Sally
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Nothing new under the sun.

 

2015:   Teen Bathes In Pig Blood On MTV's 'True Life' To Stay Forever Young

 

1600s  Countess Elizabeth Báthory https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Báthory_in_popular_culture#Vampire_myth

The emergence of the bloodbath or blood seeker for vanity myth coincided with the vampire scares that haunted Europe in the early 18th century, reaching even into educated and scientific circles but the strong connection between the bloodbath or blood seeker myth and vampiric myth was not made until the 1970s. The first connections were made to promote works of fiction by linking them to the already commercially successful Dracula story. Thus a 1970 movie based on Báthory and the bloodbath or blood seeker for vanity myth was titled Countess Dracula.

Some Báthory biographers, McNally in particular, have tried to establish the bloodbath myth and the historical Elizabeth Báthory as a source of influence for Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula, pointing to similarities in settings and motifs and the fact that Stoker might have read about her. This theory is strongly disputed by author Elizabeth Miller.[8]

Meanwhile, Báthory has become an influence for modern vampire literature and vampire films.[9] The story, while retaining the essential facts, receives an imaginative interpretation in the horror novelist Syra Bond's Cold Blood.[10]

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