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I am hoping someone on JWTalk can help me identify this mystery rock.

I found it in the driveway last summer and picked it up because I thought it was a chunk of glass.

The closest image I can find to it, via Google search, is Schist.  But its properties don't match the properties of Schist.

Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this rock. ^_^

 

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One of my daughters is here right now,  she is into the 'healing by crystals' thing.

 

She suggested that it looks something like pyrite but she didn't really know what your sample is for sure.

 

She said she can check her books when she gets home but that won't be for hours...you'll probably have an answer by then....

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I need to know a few things ( what country and state did you find this in? And can you give us a side view? It is a little to flat and uniform ( makes me suspect it is man made) but if you found that in the American Southwest it could be Pyrite or Vermiculite or even silver ore. Try taking a blowtorch to the corner of it. If it pops like popcorn it is vermiculite. If it melts or even catches fire it is tar ( asphalt) . 

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2 hours ago, BenJepthah said:

I need to know a few things ( what country and state did you find this in? And can you give us a side view? It is a little to flat and uniform ( makes me suspect it is man made) but if you found that in the American Southwest it could be Pyrite or Vermiculite or even silver ore. Try taking a blowtorch to the corner of it. If it pops like popcorn it is vermiculite. If it melts or even catches fire it is tar ( asphalt) . 

The very center of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Alger County, USA.

899459365_SideThree.jpg.gif.27d84b4d8ea7c2476cc5e5a436336986.gif

 

I call it a sunstone because, when the sun shines directly on it,

you can see thousands of tiny suns being reflected off of

thousands of little mirror-like surfaces.^_^

 

I will try to get a good still photo of it.

 

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I'm not sure what properties don't fit schist. When I googled "types of gray glittery rocks", under images there was a pic that looked like your rock. When I followed the link to the page, under the description of the rock it says, "There are many varieties of schist and they are named for the dominant mineral comprising the rock, e.g. mica schist, green schist (green because of high chlorite content), garnet schist etc."
My interpretation of that is that the rock varies a fair amount according to the ingredients.1d177825ad0ad9b6d6932a18f39798a9.jpg

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

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Quote
Schist Rock Facts
Schist is a metamorphic rock that contains flakes of mica. Schist can originate as a sedimentary rock or igneous rock. It can contain different minerals.
Interesting Schist Rock Facts:
Schist and slate are very similar in that they are made from the same rock types except schist is subjected to more heat and pressure.
Schist is often referred to as schistosity because of its large mica flakes.
Large crystals cause schist rocks to reflect lots of light which gives it a very shiny appearance.
The large crystals in schist indicate the amount of pressure and temperature that was used to make the rock.
Specific schist rocks are named for the dominant mineral that is a part of its make-up.
Schist is derived from a German word meaning to split.
Most schist rocks originate as some type of clay or mud.
Most schist contains the mineral mica and is called mica schist.
Schist is often used as a guide to measure specific sizes and dimensions of objects.
Before the 18th century, schist, shale, and slate were used interchangeably to describe the same rock.
There are various features that distinguish schist rocks made from sedimentary rocks or those made from igneous.
Schist can be found in many countries including Brazil, parts of the US and Ireland.
Schist has been previously used to make decorative rock walls.
Presently, schist is used as a decorative stone as well as for jewelry.

In Australia, houses that were built using schist in the 1800s are still standing today.

http://www.softschools.com/facts/geology/schist_rock_facts/387/

 

You are probably right, Brother Jeff.

The two properties of schist that are highlighted in red are what caused me to

rule my rock out.  It doesn't have any large mica flakes or large crystals.

That picture is the same one I found, too.   It could be my rock's twin.

 

I am beginning to think it must be a 'variety' of some kind of schist.  Just without the large mica flakes and large crystals.  Maybe it is green schist?

It looks a little green in this pic:

IMG_20180723_210417.jpg

 

I would like to thank you all for your helpful suggestions.1360452488_Thankyou4.gif.a74b1997f61ea0e49c7d81e09a84f2bb.gif951924166_ThankYouswingaroundsignpole.gif.509722d1f4d61978570290970c05a881.gif

The reason I needed your help in my research is because Google search would not allow me to search the sites that seemed the most likely to contain

the info I needed.  I kept being blocked.  Very frustrating.

999699391_IrritatingGoogleannouncement.jpg.gif.580e20f7bcf830d43e0e47c90f40a74c.gif

 

So...until I discover otherwise...My Sunstone shall be designated as a piece of

pegmatite schist: 

497373834_pegmatiteschist.jpg.733e786cdb09d98f76b5370e0f97ff12.jpg

 

I have been a rock hound my entire life and I hope to continue to be one for

all of eternity. yes.gif.fa75aa269c8753396d9ceb3f9996d2b9.gif

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