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Sources of nutrition!
 
 
LEMON PEEL ICE CUBES
article-2661733-1570E727000005DC-621_306

Don't waste it: Lemon peel is high in fibre

Orange and lemon peels are high in fibre and contain far higher levels of antioxidants than the fruit itself.

In a recent study, the super-flavonoid antioxidants (protective nutrients that may help to significantly reduce cholesterol) taken from orange and tangerine peel were found to be 20 times more powerful than those found in the fruit's juice.

'It's well worth zesting oranges and lemons to get all the protective nutrients in their skins,' says Dr Schenker.

ALDO'S TIPS: I use citrus peel in a lot of my cooking. You can grate it over desserts and salads and add it to cakes and cocktails.

I also put large slices of citrus peel and butter under the skin when I roast a chicken. The oils in the peel bring out the flavour of the meat.

A few slices of lemon peel in a bottle of olive oil will flavour it beautifully. Citrus peels freeze well, too. Freeze large pieces and drop into drinks as a fancy alternative to ice cubes.

BROCCOLI LEAF PASTA TOPPING

According to Dr Schenker, broccoli leaves should never be thrown away. Their dark green colour indicates they are packed with vitamins and minerals, such as folate, iron and potassium.

In fact, research indicates 1oz (28g) of broccoli leaves will provide 90 per cent of your daily requirement of immune-boosting vitamin A, while 1oz of florets provides just 3 per cent.

ALDO'S TIPS: Cook the leaves quickly, as you would spinach. Blanch in boiling water, then fry with a little olive oil and garlic and add to pasta.

To get the best from broccoli stalks, make a salad by slicing off the tough outer peel and shaving what remains into ribbons with a potato peeler. Scatter with lemon zest, olive oil and Parmesan curls.

GINGER SKIN HOT TODDY

Everyone throws away the tough fibrous skin from fresh ginger, but it's worth rescuing it from the bin as it has health benefits.

'Ginger contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols,' says Dr Schenker.

'These substances are believed to be the reason so many people with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis experience reductions in pain levels and improvements in their mobility when they consume ginger regularly.'

ALDO'S TIPS: You can add ginger peel to soup for flavour, but don't forget to remove it before eating.

The peel can be used to pep up fresh juices. Put a kiwi, banana, some spinach and a little ginger into a juicer - delicious!  Alternatively, steep ginger peel in boiling water for a few minutes to make an aromatic tea. I drink this as a tonic if I am feeling under the weather. It seems to help me recover more quickly.Eat

 

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:ecstatic: I love getting information like this. Thank you so much. When we were growing up, Mama would have us drink Ginger Tea every begining of spring (feeling under the weather or not). And I love just eating the lemon peels anyway. But I am going to try the freezing technique. Again, thank you so much.

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On 7/4/2014 at 8:11 PM, bohemian said:

I love to eat lemons and when I use the juice in cooking I end up eating the flesh.  Great tips for broccoli too.  Love using as much as possible of a food.

 

On 4/8/2016 at 9:54 AM, Omo_Yeme said:

Lemon lover right here! :D

The expensive lemon fruit :shifty:

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On 13 June 2016 at 10:28 PM, Omo_Yeme said:

Well, I purchase mine online or when shopping at an organic market.  (But that can become a bit expensive).  There are several youtube tutorials also.  Search the phrase "lemon oil extraction."

The difficulty here is getting unwaxed lemons.  I don't use the skin even for zest anymore unless I can get unwaxed ones. The store which sold them locally has now closed down.

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On Monday, June 13, 2016 at 7:13 PM, dilip kumar said:

Lemon oil....? Hope do we make it

Sent from my C6802 using Tapatalk

If you put a pin into one of those dimples on the lemon peel, that is where the oil is they are little resevoirs of oil. There are so many ways of retrieving the oil.

 

Not sure how they usually do citrus - think it's cold pressed. If you go to a reliable source of oils ... the citrus is usually the cheapest. 

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4 hours ago, Thesauron said:


Here the lemons are not expensive, but some other weird thing is going on. The regular lemons can be quite large, but the ecological ones are really tiny.c27ac13c6adb7808cd38c2213f8036df.jpg

They are just different type of lemons my dear Brother .. the larger ones grow in my neighbours and I grow the smaller ones we often swap. There is more juice in the smaller ones as the skin is thicker in the bigger ones. There is a return visit around the corner who grows a type of lemon that is as big as a grapefruit ... but the skin is really really thick. Pretty sure the big lemon is a Lisbon and the small ones are called Meyers  not 100% sure though.

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They are just different type of lemons my dear Brother .. the larger ones grow in my neighbours and I grow the smaller ones we often swap. There is more juice in the smaller ones as the skin is thicker in the bigger ones. There is a return visit around the corner who grows a type of lemon that is as big as a grapefruit ... but the skin is really really thick. Pretty sure the big lemon is a Lisbon and the small ones are called Meyers  not 100% sure though.

One is genetically modified, so called GMO, the other is not. That's probably the biggest difference. Different varieties, indeed.
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Interesting. So the genectically modified one is the one with thicker skin and less juice? I wonder what benefit they would get by doing that?

 

The real interesting thing about that assumption ... is the lemon tree next door is a descendant from the original tree that came with the house. They have one tree there over 150 years old and it's a heritage pear. My neighbours house is under historic trust, because it was settled by the first settlers in NZ, and they brought a lot of saplings from the UK with them. They have preserved many of the saplings that came with the house. Camelias, heritage pears, the lemon trees and pears.

 

So I don't think in this case the bigger lemon is GMO, but I'm sure many are, in fact we don't know exactly what we are eating anymore do we?

Edited by Stormswift
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Interesting. So the genectically modified one is the one with thicker skin and less juice? I wonder what benefit they would get by doing that?
 
The real interesting thing about that assumption ... is the lemon tree next door is a descendant from the original tree that came with the house. They have one tree there over 150 years old and it's a heritage pear. My neighbours house is under historic trust, because it was settled by the first settlers in NZ, and they brought a lot of saplings from the UK with them. They have preserved many of the saplings that came with the house. Camelias, heritage pears, the lemon trees and pears.
 
So I don't think in this case the bigger lemon is GMO, but I'm sure many are, in fact we don't know exactly what we are eating anymore do we?

In fact, yes, it is GMO. It's stated in the store. It sells better, I guess, and might be cheaper to produce. People are not that smart when it comes to food. Just look at tomatoes. People are prepared to buy large, tasteless tomatoes because they are cheaper and look good.
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5 minutes ago, Thesauron said:


In fact, yes, it is GMO. It's stated in the store. It sells better, I guess, and might be cheaper to produce. People are not that smart when it comes to food. Just look at tomatoes. People are prepared to buy large, tasteless tomatoes because they are cheaper and look good.

Yes you are right, do they HAVE to say its GMO where you live? In NZ they don't, so we go for heritage fruits/veges as they can be traced back to their origins. 

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