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Breaking Barriers


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 Here I go again.

 

 Lately racism being on the news. If people want to break the barrier. Then here is some good examples:

 

 1. I was down south at a convention and a black sister who was in the same congregation I was when I was younger saw me there. When  the convention was over, I saw her in the parking lot, we was about 30 feet apart and when we saw each other we know we were going to hug each other, but that was not the case. When we grab each other, I was going to hug her and probably kiss her on the cheek, but she grab me a kiss me right on the lips like my mother would do. Yes, I was shocked, but I didn't mind.

 

 2. Deep down in the south, when I was at the Atlanta airport (one of the most busiest airport in the world), this black women who was working there helping me out to get where I was going and if it wasn't for her, I would be in a mess. I was so happy and I gave her a hug. I think she was shocked. Maybe, she thought a white man would never treat her that way.

 

 So my point is that not just a hand shake would break barriers (many friends and world leaders do it and it nothing wrong with this). But hugs and kisses ON THE CHEEK works just as well or maybe even better.

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I know the sound barrier can be broken when you reach about 767 mph, but I don't think I will ever break it.

 

There was a terrible road accident a while back where a couple semi trucks hit the walls erected by the Interstate they build to stop the sound - so you could say they broke the sound barrier.

 

A few ships have run aground near shore destroying quite a bit of coral - so, they broke the coral barrier.

 

I'm sure if I really though about it I could think of some other barriers that have been broken.

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I love, how in Jehovah's organization, we don't see color as a divider, but as a way to unify us. We can go anywhere & instantly make friends & add to our family.

Growing up there was a young brother that my mom took under her wing. He would call & ask: "Is mom there?" And it didn't bother me. Nor did it bother me that he was a different color than me, he was my brother.

The last moments before my mom passed away. He came in the ER room & I left, he needed time with his mom.

What might seem odd about all of this is that his parents, who are in the truth, were close with us & there was never any jealousy. They knew my mom was his as well. A few years ago he passed away too.

It will be wonderful to see my brother & my parent's resurrected in paradise.

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Hugging another person will break a barrier alright. The barrier between where they kick you in the shins or plant a foot in your....you get the picture. Huggy people creep me out. Especially men. I hope you at least ASK if you can hug them.

I respect you what you saying sis. Yet, I'm a huggy person.

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I love, how in Jehovah's organization, we don't see color as a divider, but as a way to unify us. We can go anywhere & instantly make friends & add to our family.

Growing up there was a young brother that my mom took under her wing. He would call & ask: "Is mom there?" And it didn't bother me. Nor did it bother me that he was a different color than me, he was my brother.

The last moments before my mom passed away. He came in the ER room & I left, he needed time with his mom.

What might seem odd about all of this is that his parents, who are in the truth, were close with us & there was never any jealousy. They knew my mom was his as well. A few years ago he passed away too.

It will be wonderful to see my brother & my parent's resurrected in paradise.

You are right sis. I have SPIRITUAL and physical families that consist different races and I love it.  A matter of fact there is a sister from our local congregation who is black and native american wants to work with me field service. Why? Because I show deep respect to her and she loves it. That is very hard to find in the world.

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My youngest child, a daughter, is black (whattt? you're kidding! Lol. But actually a mutt like her momma).Anyway, she goes down south, meets a brother and marries him. All is well. They marry at the home of one of my sisters. (Why not the KH hall I think is self explanatory).Anyway, they (my sister and her husband), got a christendom minister to do the honors. The minister was fine seeing my son-in-law standing at the "alter" waiting for his bride. Until my daughter, in her wedding finery, walked in. Though you can see this minister tried to hide it, her feelings were clearly written all over her face. She didn't approve. Why? Because my son-in-law is white.

Then to make matters worse as they say, a niece was there too. With her white boyfriend. Oh it gets better. Though I had no know idea who a certain guy was, he was there with a woman you could tell had a connection. He was black, she was white. Oh! And by the way my niece is now married to her white husband.

When I got back from the wedding and showed the pictures, one sister felt my daughter hit the jackpot by marrying a white man. I didn't understand nor "get" what she was babbling about. Then a brother looked at the pictures and said something really, and I'm sorry but I have to say it: ignorant. He said "that's what a lot of black sisters do, go to the south and marry a white brother." I had to let him know my daughter did not go down South to even marry ANYONE.

Racism is reigning in this system!

But I understand Glenn, why the black sister was shocked with you. You see one time in Georgia my father drove me to a restaurant for take out. The woman was white and maaming me all overvthe place. "What would you like maam? Anything else maam? Would that be all maam"? Blew me away! I was definitely not used to that in coming from a fast paced, modern city called NYC where everything curt and dry. There's a white elderly gentleman in downtown Brooklyn here, though I forget how we met (probably service), when we see each other we always great each other with great and loud joy!! You should see the looks of people. Downright dirty! Well, that's THEIR problem.

Edited by Luezette
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One day out in service with magazine work, I met a mixed couple, he black, she white.. To tell the truth I thought she was latino.

Anyway while we talked, he was getting a little impatient so she had to leave. But not before she confided in me and wanted to know why black women get upset with her, being a white woman. I didn't want to get into the slavery aspect of it because for one thing I'm in service, and for another thing I didn't know and understand either, slavery put aside. So I turned it around and answered it with a question: "Who has the problem? You? She said no. "So let them deal with it. You don't have to."

That's what I do. I just let them fools deal with their hating ways, live my life. I don't have time. Besides, lol, whats a mutt, a heinz 57 supposed to do anyway? Lol.

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My youngest child, a daughter, is black (whattt? you're kidding! Lol. But actually a mutt like her momma).Anyway, she goes down south, meets a brother and marries him. All is well. They marry at the home of one of my sisters. (Why not the KH hall I think is self explanatory).Anyway, they (my sister and her husband), got a christendom minister to do the honors. The minister was fine seeing my son-in-law standing at the "alter" waiting for his bride. Until my daughter, in her wedding finery, walked in. Though you can see this minister tried to hide it, her feelings were clearly written all over her face. She didn't approve. Why? Because my son-in-law is white.

Then to make matters worse as they say, a niece was there too. With her white boyfriend. Oh it gets better. Though I had no know idea who a certain guy was, he was there with a woman you could tell had a connection. He was black, she was white. Oh! And by the way my niece is now married to her white husband.

When I got back from the wedding and showed the pictures, one sister felt my daughter hit the jackpot by marrying a white man. I didn't understand nor "get" what she was babbling about. Then a brother looked at the pictures and said something really, and I'm sorry but I have to say it: ignorant. He said "that's what a lot of black sisters do, go to the south and marry a white brother." I had to let him know my daughter did not go down South to even marry ANYONE.

Racism is reigning in this system!

But I understand Glenn, why the black sister was shocked with you. You see one time in Georgia my father drove me to a restaurant for take out. The woman was white and maaming me all overvthe place. "What would you like maam? Anything else maam? Would that be all maam"? Blew me away! I was definitely not used to that in coming from a fast paced, modern city called NYC where everything curt and dry. There's a white elderly gentleman in downtown Brooklyn here, though I forget how we met (probably service), when we see each other we always great each other with great and loud joy!! You should see the looks of people. Downright dirty! Well, that's THEIR problem.

Luezette It is sad to her this. Yet, I'm glad to here it too. Why???? Many friends and people don't want to her this. There are sisters that I know who is black and native american can confide issues of racism to me because I listen to them and they told they love it. They want to speak out and I there to hear them. Like you, they are precious to me.

 

 I hope I go down south in a couple of months. Last time I was there, I work with all black friends in field service and i love this. And  I told someone that I a have a little native american in me and later it became an small issue. Well I'm might go down there and rattle some cages, yet I love them.

 

 I'm glad we are color blind sis.

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Actually Glenn, to be truthful and maybe this is a kinda wrong attitude for me to have but I'm really quite proud of who I and my family are: white, red and black. I say maybe wrong because I represent Jehovah and I think that perhaps that "proud" statement is nationalistic? I don't know.

When in college, because I live in a predominately black/latino neighborhood where the people are ignorantly full of hatred for white people therefore blame them for every single misfortune in their lives (literally, I kid you not :(), I was ridiculed by some for "she must think she's white" Lol!! Yep I just laugh. For they had no idea how close to the truth they were!! Lol.

Well anyway, that's them, this is you, this is me, this is us. We are serving a God who is and always has been and always will be color blind. A God who created we humans as one race. A God who isn't prejudiced against anyone. A God who lets it rain, snow, sun shine upon everyone. A God who, with much pain upon himself, allowed his son to die for all so that everyone can live forever. Forever where there be no color just different shades of melanin in their skin, different eye shapes, hair texture, etc which only shows his personality...he takes delight in different things like different shades of red, gree, flowers, apples, tomatoes, etc. Oh this can go on and on. It's absolutely beautiful!!!!!

Edited by Luezette
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I hate to be a wet blanket but I just want to add a word of caution. There are a lot of people with deep rooted emotional issues and they may be offended by someone touching them. That happened to me about 20 years when I very fatherly put my hand on a sister while talking to her, she immediately went to the elder body and accused me of acting inappropriately. I found out later that she had been abused by her grandfather when she was a child and she was still scared of men.

Just be careful, even when you know someone, you may not have all the facts.

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Actually Glenn, to be truthful and maybe this is a kinda wrong attitude for me to have but I'm really quite proud of who I and my family are: white, red and black. I say maybe wrong because I represent Jehovah and I think that perhaps that "proud" statement is nationalistic? I don't know.

When in college, because I live in a predominately black/latino neighborhood where the people are ignorantly full of hatred for white people therefore blame them for every single misfortune in their lives (literally, I kid you not :(), I was ridiculed by some for "she must think she's white" Lol!! Yep I just laugh. For they had no idea how close to the truth they were!! Lol.

Well anyway, that's them, this is you, this is me, this is us. We are serving a God who is and always has been and always will be color blind. A God who created we humans as one race. A God who isn't prejudiced against anyone. A God who lets it rain, snow, sun shine upon everyone. A God who, with much pain upon himself, allowed his son to die for all so that everyone can live forever. Forever where there be no color just different shades of melanin in their skin, different eye shapes, hair texture, etc which only shows his personality...he takes delight in different things like different shades of red, gree, flowers, apples, tomatoes, etc. Oh this can go on and on. It's absolutely beautiful!!!!!

Sis, in the New World, the blacks, mix races and the native americans will be raise up from the dead. They were victims of racism and they will talk about it too. We all have have an ears to listen to them. If not, you, others and I will.

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I hate to be a wet blanket but I just want to add a word of caution. There are a lot of people with deep rooted emotional issues and they may be offended by someone touching them. That happened to me about 20 years when I very fatherly put my hand on a sister while talking to her, she immediately went to the elder body and accused me of acting inappropriately. I found out later that she had been abused by her grandfather when she was a child and she was still scared of men.

Just be careful, even when you know someone, you may not have all the facts.

 It is sad to hear about this brother.

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Unfortunately, you're right Richard. Remember the unbaptized publisher I mentioned here, the one who likes to hug? Well, I'm a hugger too coming from a family of huggers...literally. We're touchers, not immorally, just touchers, holding handers.

It's just that this brother-to-be goes, in my opinion, too far. His hugs, to me, felt like almost sensual (I will not go into detail). Since I'm single and trying to stay happily single without any male distractions, I felt I had to put him in his place. But I'm not dead so I was feeling things, normal things but knowing me I felt it had to stop. So I told him (I think my words were appropriate.I think).

Yet now he seem to be giving me looks of endearment. He makes sure I see him giving me rapt attention when I'm in conversation with sisters. You know how you can feel someone looking at you? Sure. So I turn around and there he is justa looking at me, smiling up if he's sitting. I ignore him. (Oh my goodness! This just occurred to me as I'm typing this: maybe he thinks I'm playing hard to get? grrrr...).

Anyway, well at least the hugging stopped.

(And I'm running my "mouth."). Sorry.

Yes, we do have to be careful who we touch

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I live in the South .....

 

We had our RC over the July 4 weekend. There were many "mixed" couples. Not just black/white - there were a variety of mixed ethnicities and no on stared at them or looked open-mouthed as hugs were shared.

 

I just worked at an LDC project in Georgia (definitely the South) We had one couple ..... he was Hispanic, she was Black .... and a few others. The rooming department had friends staying in the homes of local Witnesses. These homes were from friends from Congregations from around the area, many of whom will not even attend the new Hall. They were from all ethnicities and so were the ones, like us, staying with them. The Brother in charge of rooming NEVER asked what color/ethnicity you were, he just wanted to know how many, relationship (wife/husband, Parent/child, brother/sister) to make sure the sleeping arrangements were appropriate.

 

No one seemed to care who stayed with who, as long as they were spiritual - no comments were said or implied as to color/ethnicity ........

 

But then, this is the "Deep South"

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Lol. One day we were witnessing at a train station. Not the cart but because it was cold and we needed to be inside. A group of Korean sisters walked up and after the wonderful hellos, etc (you know how we get: all loud, hugee and such, lol), the sisters asked for directions to Bethel. They had a map (confusing thing it can be), but felt since we were here it's better. We English speaking sisters were all talking at the same time, the Korean sisters looked at each other in bewilderment so I decided to just take them outside, show them the bus and make sure they get on safely.

The bus finally came, they got on and that is when the fun really began. The sisters and I were giggling, I'm explaining to the driver where they're going, the sisters headed towards the back while still giggling and chatting in Korean, the driver curiosly watching them, the other passengers seemed annoyed. Seeing that and in an attempt to make sure they're not bothered, I told the driver "those are my sisters. make sure they get where they're going!!"

Everything got quiet. Real quiet. I got off the bus. It rolled away.

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Hugging another person will break a barrier alright. The barrier between where they kick you in the shins or plant a foot in your....you get the picture. Huggy people creep me out. Especially men. I hope you at least ASK if you can hug them.

My husb (not in the truth, but comes to some meetings and assemblies) has a fit when people come up and hug me. Coming in to the truth, I was told a brother should not even touch a sister who was not his wife.  Now, dear Husb may not remember scripture, but this he remembers, and thinks it is my fault if someone comes up and hugs me. I do everything I can to discourage this and move so that it is just a shoulder-side hug, but I know i am going to have to face the music later. Once, a sister came up and hugged me. She was loaded with perfume and I had to leave meeting immediately. I did not know if I would make it to the hospital or home ( a few minutes difference in time). I made it home, yanking my clothing off and jumped in the shower (missed the entire meeting, and could have spent a thousand $ or more if I went straight to the hospital. "Your fault," says Dear Husb,"you let people hug you." For some reason, husb thinks I am inviting this 'hugging'. Makes a lot more problems for me and has definitely not brought husb any closer to coming into the truth. It is assuming to project that close of a physical interaction, especially male to female. In the Bethel congregation that I attend, the brothers will shake hands with people or execute the popular fist of forearm bump. I have never had a mature Bethel brother try to hug me. Much younger ones, like 3 year olds, will go in for a hug. 

Edited by kejedo
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My husb (not in the truth, but comes to some meetings and assemblies) has a fit when people come up and hug me. Coming in to the truth, I was told a brother should not even touch a sister who was not his wife.  

 

That reminds me that the brothers on stage were once told not to call a sister by her first name because it would be too familiar and may cause problems with a non-witness mate. Hmm...more homework...

 

Good point to consider when going in for the hug...

 

EDIT: Found it. It's older than I am...

*** w51 9/15 p. 575 Questions From Readers ***
Another situation, a woman may be in the truth, her husband not, and he may come to one of the meetings. He hears another man call his wife by her first name, and that from the platform in front of the entire congregation. Understandably so, he does not like it. So in view of these and other situations, whom are you going to call by their first name? Some will be offended if you do; others hurt if you do not. All difficulties vanish if when on the platform we use last names for everyone, including those of our own family.
Edited by Tortuga
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