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Rare Steak Anyone?


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I had a quick question that I couldn't find the answer to on the WOL. Myself and some of the friends were out to dinner, and one of the brothers ordered a rare steak. I rarely (lol) eat beef so I was surprised to see cooked blood seeping on the plate as he devoured it. My friend whispered to me, to not embarrass him, "Can we eat that?" I gave her a shrug, because I honestly have no idea.

 

Later on in private, I asked a third party and he said "Oh, absolutely! We can have rare meat." I was reassured, but that steak was definitely bloody and the whole situation left a bad taste in my mouth. What does the Governing Body have to say? I'm stumped. ☹️

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If the animal was bled, which is certainly the case with modern abattoirs, then the fact that the meat is 'bloody' is really of no consequence.  Of course, if your conscience would not allow you to eat it, then you should not. But there is no reason scriptuarally to not eat it from a blood standpoint.  Conscience is something  else. 

 

I love steak that is on the rare side of medium/rare, but if I thought someone would be stumbled by my eating it, I would just go for medium/rare.

 

:chef:

 

Edit:  how about steak tartare?  Totally raw, and beautiful too.

Edited by bohemian
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I had a quick question that I couldn't find the answer to on the WOL. Myself and some of the friends were out to dinner, and one of the brothers ordered a rare steak. I rarely (lol) eat beef so I was surprised to see cooked blood seeping on the plate as he devoured it. My friend whispered to me, to not embarrass him, "Can we eat that?" I gave her a shrug, because I honestly have no idea.
 
Later on in private, I asked a third party and he said "Oh, absolutely! We can have rare meat." I was reassured, but that steak was definitely bloody and the whole situation left a bad taste in my mouth. What does the Governing Body have to say? I'm stumped. ☹️


You don't make a steak less rare by bleeding it, you make it less rare by cooking it. You make it less bloody by bleeding it, Also, the red stuff isn't really blood. It’s myoglobin, the protein that delivers oxygen to an animal’s muscles. This protein turns red when meat is cut, or exposed to air.


Johan
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12 minutes ago, lovejoypeace said:

 

I had a quick question that I couldn't find the answer to on the WOL. Myself and some of the friends were out to dinner, and one of the brothers ordered a rare steak. I rarely (lol) eat beef so I was surprised to see cooked blood seeping on the plate as he devoured it. My friend whispered to me, to not embarrass him, "Can we eat that?" I gave her a shrug, because I honestly have no idea.

 

Later on in private, I asked a third party and he said "Oh, absolutely! We can have rare meat." I was reassured, but that steak was definitely bloody and the whole situation left a bad taste in my mouth. What does the Governing Body have to say? I'm stumped. ☹️

 

I like Texas rare, but the room needs darkened or my Wife will loose her appetite!  However she likes steak tartare, go figure.

If someone would be stumbled* by my eating a rare steak they won't be going to dinner with me. :D

 

*Stumbled,  word overly used and overly misused. Why do we never say tripped?

 

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Rare, medium, or well done?

 

Whats the difference between  blood residue, cooked blood residue or overly cooked blood residue?

 

Is cooked blood residue okay but uncooked not?

 

Is cooked blood sausage okay but uncooked not?

 

Whats the difference between residual blood in bled meat and blood?

 

All good questions to consider with quite obvious answers.

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45 minutes ago, Old said:

I like Texas rare, but the room needs darkened or my Wife will loose her appetite!  However she likes steak tartare, go figure.

If someone would be stumbled* by my eating a rare steak they won't be going to dinner with me. :D

 

*Stumbled,  word overly used and overly misused. Why do we never say tripped?

 

:lol1:You're funny! 

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in fact, ironically, if going in for an operation that involves the blood issue, one of the best things you can do to build your iron reserves is to eat raw or as raw as you can stomach - kidneys or liver. 

 

LOLLOL just picked up the pun about speaking ironically about iron ... funnnny - waddles away chuckling.

 

As long as the meat you eat (as mentioned above) has been bled and does not contain concealed blood that results from not being bled. You have observed Jehovah's command and shown him respect by eating flesh that has been bled. That is all he expects in this matter.

Edited by Stormswift
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24 minutes ago, Stormswift said:

in fact, ironically, if going in for an operation that involves the blood issue, one of the best things you can do to build your iron reserves is to eat raw or as raw as you can stomach - kidneys or liver. 

 

LOLLOL just picked up the pun about speaking ironically about iron ... funnnny - waddles away chuckling.

 

As long as the meat you eat (as mentioned above) has been bled and does not contain concealed blood that results from not being bled. You have observed Jehovah's command and shown him respect by eating flesh that has been bled. That is all he expects in this matter.

 

So, it's okay as in health wise to eat raw meat?

 

Just asking so as to get others views, no judgment here, just obtaining information.

 

I personally never liked steak well done, too tough to chew plus dry. Is it like that rare too? Because I've never eaten it that way. 

 

  Thanks in advance. 

Edited by loving life
Additional guestion.
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30 minutes ago, loving life said:

So, it's okay as in health wise to eat raw meat?

 

Just asking so as to get others views, no judgment here, just obtaining information.

 

I personally never liked steak well done, too tough to chew plus dry. Is it like that rare too? Because I've never eaten it that way. 

 

  Thanks in advance. 

 

I live in NZ and I only eat fresh meat ... I do eat next to raw kidneys (lightly fried with onions) ... so if you are asking healthwise, then it could vary as to where you live and your source of meat. Delicious dishes like steak tartar only taste good when using the freshest meat possible - i would never use supermarket meat for that.

 

We New Zealanders eat a lot of raw fish too, and this again, only works if its fresh. So there is no fast rule as everyone lives in different parts of the world, subject to different cuisines and different food sources and cultures.

 

If you are talking scripturally, there is NO scripture to say you can't eat raw meats. But as with everything, its a personal decision.

Edited by Stormswift
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1 minute ago, Stormswift said:

I live in NZ and I only eat fresh meat ... I do eat next to raw kidneys (lightly fried with onions) ... so if you are asking healthwise, then it could vary as to where you and your source of meat. Delicious dishes like steak tartar only taste good when using the freshest meat possible - i would never use supermarket meat for that.

 

We New Zealanders eat a lot of raw fish too, and this again, only works if its fresh. So there is no fast rule as everyone lives in different parts of the world, subject to different cuisines and different food sources and cultures.

 

If you are talking scripturally, there is NO scripture to say you can't eat raw meats. But as with everything, its a personal decision.

I was just asking in reference to health.

 

I've never ate raw fish either but I live in the USA.  I can understand what you are saying as to the fresh part but have never been taught to eat meat raw, vegetables yes, meat no. 

 

As I've said I am not judging just gaining insight into other cultures or countries.

 

 Thanks! 

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I can only answer as to MY experience, for example someone in the UK may be turned off trying anything that contains raw beef because of the Mad Cow Disease scare and potential that still may exist.

 

We drink raw milk too ... and some say there are health risks to that, but according to MY research I feel for me and my family there are more health risks in processed milk.

 

So ... research research research according to YOUR circumstances is the best answer I can give.

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I agree that for raw meat/fish freshness and quality are essentials.  If you want to make steak tartare yourself ask your butcher for the best quality and tell him what it is for!  He doesn't want any repercussions.

Raw fish can be wonderful, salmon tartare, tuna tartare etc.

 

Restaurants serving such items will know the need for high quality ingredients.

 

As for items made from blood, like blood sausage (black pudding etc) we know what our decision must be because of the source. Before I got the truth I used to eat black pudding, and liked it very much.  But when I learned of Jehovah's standards, I had to change.

 

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4 hours ago, loving life said:

 

I personally never liked steak well done, too tough to chew plus dry. Is it like that rare too? Because I've never eaten it that way. 

 

  Thanks in advance. 

 

 

A good cut of meat cooked rare is very easy to chew.

Got a story to tell.

My father in law Gilbert, would never eat any meat if it showed any color let alone dripped red juice. They lived on a beef ranch. The freezer was always full of meat. While pioneering I went to work for the family to feed the cattle, milk the cow and cook dinner. Boy! did I hear about it if a steak or roast was even a little pink. The kids would never finish their meat. Most of the meat was thrown out, cooked or uncooked. The oldest daughter, who unbeknown at that time was my wife to be, disliked meat in general. 

Gilbert liked to hunt, the freezer always contain elk and venison. He was fond of venison but the elk was tough and hard to eat (It was over cooked until it had a cardboard consistency.)

One year while hunting in the Blue Mountains one of the party shot big elk. A couple of us stayed to cut it up where it had fallen and two others went back to camp to get the pack horses. By the time they returned it was late on a winter afternoon, We knew our journey back to camp would be in the dark, not really a problem. Then it happened, the fog rolled in and we couldn’t see thirty feet. After stumbling around in the dark for an hour we found ourselves at the end of ridge we had never seen before, totally lost. For safety’s sake the four of us hunkered down and built a big fire. We had matches, but no food. Two of us had but a couple of sandwiches and an apple since before dawn. Food and warmth, we adjusted the warmth by turning our done side away from the fire every few minutes. Food? We had four quarters of elk on the pack horses.

Gilbert started hacking away on the elk and before long big elk steaks roasting over the fire. We were hungry and relished the chunks of steak. Gilbert said that was the most tender meat he had ever eaten. Long story short, the wind came up and the fog lifted. We made back to camp about midnight.

Later on we would share that elk and that story around the dinner table. Gilbert said that elk was so tender on the mountain and now it is as tough as a gourd. The reason? I didn’t want to start an argument, unusual for me, so I kept my mouth shut. I explained it to my, now wife, later.

There is no way you can see how well done the meat is at night over a bright fire. We were eating meat browned on the outside and just warmed in the middle. At twenty degrees no meat stayed hot for long. Later getting that elk out of the freezer he cooked it to death, and yes it was tough, tough as a gourd and without flavor.

 

The part we had in our freezer at home was as tender as it had been on the mountain

 

 

 

Edited by Old
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The red juice that often collects in a package of red meat is not blood, as many assume. Most of the blood is removed during processing and any that remains is usually contained within the muscle tissue.

The red liquid, instead, is a mixture of water and a protein called myoglobin, whose purpose is to help ship oxygen to muscle cells. Myoglobin is deeply pigmented, which is why the more myoglobin a meat contains, the darker (or redder) the meat will be.

Red meat is comprised of muscles that are used for extensive activity. Remember, myoglobin's role is to help bring oxygen to the muscles, and oxygen is required to give muscles energy.

So the more the muscles are used, the more myoglobin they'll contain (and the redder in color they'll be). This is why when you prepare "white" meat such as poultry or fish, you won't find any "blood" in the package – the white meat contains hardly any myoglobin.

The color changes that occur as meat is cooked are also due to myoglobin. In white meat, which will be translucent when it's raw, proteins coagulate as it is cooked, resulting in the whitish opaque appearance.1

In red meat, myoglobin changes from red to tan and grayish brown as it is heated. As reported by the New York Times, this color change also has to do with moisture, which is why well-done meat that's turned gray-brown is often dry:

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Didn't anyone mention sarcoplasm?

While growing up in my "ignorance" I thought it, the juice, was blood. Then due to personal research I've come to recognize the intracellular makeup and processes of muscle and the wonderful circulatory system. So now I eat medium/rare to medium burgers and steaks. My wife eats shoe leather hence she doesn't get a nice cut of steak and she's cool with that. I struggle to finish her steak when she's full and when we go out she has the location butterfly her steak...

Sarcoplasmic proteins and its effects on meat quality parameters

https://www.scitechnol.com/proceedings/sarcoplasmic-proteins-and-its-effects-on-meat-quality-parameters-701.html

Muscles contain 70-75% water, 22% protein, 2-4% intramuscular fat and 2% of other components such as phosphates and minerals. Muscle proteins consists of three groups which are 7% sarcoplasmic proteins (water soluble), 13% myofibrillar proteins (soluble in salt solutions) and 2% stromal proteins (soluble in alkaline or acid solution) and they play different roles in meat processing. Sarcoplasmic proteins are responsible for the metabolism in an animal cell. They are found in the sarcoplasm or fluid surrounding the myofibrils. They are made up of mostly oxidative enzymes, heme pigments (myoglobin), the mitochondrial oxidative enzymes, lysosomal enzymes, and nucleoproteins. Glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, enolase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, phosphorylase, and myoglobin are the main Sarcoplasmic proteins and around 90 different proteins belong to the group of sarcoplasmic proteins. Myoglobin (color of meat) and heamoglobin (color of blood) are also the most important types of Sarcoplasmic proteins. Several studies show that the solubility of Sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in meat from quality classes, and reported that the solubility of sarcoplasmic protein may act as a better indicator for muscle quality. Studies indicate that the change of the Sarcoplasmic fraction is not directly involved in the muscle tenderness but the denaturation of Sarcoplasmic proteins has an impact on meat quality parameters such as color and water holding capacity.


Oh and BTW, I thank God that he allows me to eat the fat!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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3 hours ago, Tbs77 said:

Muscles contain 70-75% water, 22% protein, 2-4% intramuscular fat and 2% of other components such as phosphates and minerals. Muscle proteins consists of three groups which are 7% sarcoplasmic proteins (water soluble), 13% myofibrillar proteins (soluble in salt solutions) and 2% stromal proteins (soluble in alkaline or acid solution) and they play different roles in meat processing. Sarcoplasmic proteins are responsible for the metabolism in an animal cell. They are found in the sarcoplasm or fluid surrounding the myofibrils. They are made up of mostly oxidative enzymes, heme pigments (myoglobin), the mitochondrial oxidative enzymes, lysosomal enzymes, and nucleoproteins. Glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, enolase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, phosphorylase, and myoglobin are the main Sarcoplasmic proteins and around 90 different proteins belong to the group of sarcoplasmic proteins. Myoglobin (color of meat) and heamoglobin (color of blood) are also the most important types of Sarcoplasmic proteins. Several studies show that the solubility of Sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in meat from quality classes, and reported that the solubility of sarcoplasmic protein may act as a better indicator for muscle quality. Studies indicate that the change of the Sarcoplasmic fraction is not directly involved in the muscle tenderness but the denaturation of Sarcoplasmic proteins has an impact on meat quality parameters such as color and water holding capacity.

I recognize some of those words----maybe. .

:confused:

 

:D

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My father-in-law eats his steak "well,well,well,well .... well" done (as he puts it).

 

If the steak is not "brown" all the way through - he will say it is raw!

 

He wants his pork and chicken cooked just as done.

 

 

Now, as to hamburger - this can be a cause for concern. Since the things that grow on meat that can cause illness grow on the outside, cooking a steak less than "done" is fine, providing the outside was cleaned or properly seared. However, since ground meat has the "outside" all though the inside, unless it is "fresh ground", cooking it less that "done" can cause problems.

 

 

Edited by Qapla
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My father-in-law eats his steak "well,well,well,well .... well" done (as he puts it).
 
If the steak is not "brown" all the way through - he will say it is raw!
 
He wants his pork and chicken cooked just as done.
 
 
Now, as to hamburger - this can be a cause for concern. Since the things that grow on meat that can cause illness grow on the outside, cooking a steak less than "done" is fine, providing the outside was cleaned or properly seared. However, since ground meat has the "outside" all though the inside, unless it is "fresh ground", cooking it less that "done" can cause problems.
 
 

Ground meat that is to be served raw needs to have been extremely well cared for. Unfortunately, this is not always true for your regular burger patty. You can serve it raw in the form of tartar if you know what you're doing.


Johan
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