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is that ok if I do this..?


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I work with cars. 

recently some opportunities has come up to help others outside of my work,including many of our brothers.

is that ok to do a job for someone on his car and get paid for it?

without bills, as i have no company

would you please help me with some references too.

thanks in advance!!

Michael


Edited by Michael Rezmuves
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Sounds like something that would involve local regulations. 

 

But, here where I live if you use your time, tools, and premises it is okay to supplement your income. When I deal with Brothers or Sisters in business matters I always put things in writing, just to make things clear and avoid any type of confusion or bad feelings with them. 

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Only with my personal tools in my free time.

Wouldn't that be black job.?

Is my main question

I'm not familiar with that term "black job". As Steven said, it depends on your local laws but there are a lot of people that do "side jobs" in the USA as long as it doesn't affect their employers business. 

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Black job is working, getting paid for it but don't pay tax.

I really appreciate your input

 

Here in the US there are forms to report cash income and pay the appropriate taxes. This is something we want to do as part of being in subjection to the superior authorities. If it is legal in your area I would take the additional jobs and always make sure to pay caesars things to caesar. 

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Black job is working, getting paid for it but don't pay tax.

I really appreciate your input

 

I understand your question now.

It is appropriate for someone that earns extra income to report that income on their tax form. If your tax laws require you to report all of your income then you need to maintain your Christian honesty and do as the law tells you.

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I understand your question now.

It is appropriate for someone that earns extra income to report that income on their tax form. If your tax laws require you to report all of your income then you need to maintain your Christian honesty and do as the law tells you.

 

It's so easy to get away with not paying taxes. This is one area I struggle with at times. Especially when it comes to paying sales taxes for online purchases. I always want to skip that form, it would be so easy. 

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Some friends do a job on a "donation" basis, you can give what you feel you can.  Some pay with gift cards instead of cash.  This is helpful especially for those who are on Social Security.

 

I understand that things are difficult for many people, but these things sound a little too close to trying to circumvent the system. I know I personally wouldn't feel comfortable with paying a Brother or Sister that way.

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I understand that things are difficult for many people, but these things sound a little too close to trying to circumvent the system. I know I personally wouldn't feel comfortable with paying a Brother or Sister that way.

Great point!


Edited by Michael Rezmuves
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I understand that things are difficult for many people, but these things sound a little too close to trying to circumvent the system. I know I personally wouldn't feel comfortable with paying a Brother or Sister that way.

So you count any gift cards you receive as "income" even though they are just that a "gift" for something nice you did for them that they appreciate? I've only done this for those who have specifically said - 'I don't want any pay for this but it's up to you if you want to show any appreciation, I shop at Wal-Mart . . . etc.'  This way they can't feel bad if the person is unable to give them something monetarily and if they can - it's a way of saying "thank you" for what you did.

 

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So you count any gift cards you receive as "income" even though they are just that a "gift" for something nice you did for them that they appreciate? I've only done this for those who have specifically said - 'I don't want any pay for this but it's up to you if you want to show any appreciation, I shop at Wal-Mart . . . etc.'  This way they can't feel bad if the person is unable to give them something monetarily and if they can - it's a way of saying "thank you" for what you did.

 

 

The way your phrased it, especially putting "donation" in quotation marks and your mention of a federal program leans towards an attempt at deception. There is nothing wrong with an honest barter system such as I'll rebuild your transmission if you paint my house. And gifts and acts of kindness are a way of showing we care, but I am against acts of subversion. The way you put "donation" in quotes reminds me of those without a license who try to sell marijuana (unsuccessfully) by offering the drug in exchange for a "donation". I feel it would be improper for a christian to look for loopholes in the system. Just my point of view. 

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I am really good at computer, technology etc. I helped design and implement the set up at our KH with a brother as we both work in IT and are good with computers. However, I have also become the default "helpdesk" for the friends - when something, anything is wrong with their computers they want me to help them out. I have no problem doing it, one off for people if I am with them on field service etc - however, one elderly sister insists on paying me $10 to me to help her. 

 

Sounds ridiculous, but I put it as income on my taxes - as we have to pay things to Caeser. I would not do it any differently. 

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This opens up a whole new kettle of worms in my eyes.  Many times our congregation takes up "donations" for those in need at our hall, sometimes it can amount to 1000.00 or more.  I guess I never stopped to think that they would have to take a couple hundred out of that to pay taxes on that money.  I always considered it a gift.  To me, a donation is a gift also (when I make a donation to jw.org they call it a gift).  I never thought about having to pay taxes on a gift.  I don't keep track of the gift cards I may receive from someone or the money someone gives me for gas (donation) when out in service.  I'm not as good in these matters as most of you are, so there is definite need for improvement on my part.

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This opens up a whole new kettle of worms in my eyes.  Many times our congregation takes up "donations" for those in need at our hall, sometimes it can amount to 1000.00 or more.  I guess I never stopped to think that they would have to take a couple hundred out of that to pay taxes on that money.  I always considered it a gift.  To me, a donation is a gift also (when I make a donation to jw.org they call it a gift).  I never thought about having to pay taxes on a gift.  I don't keep track of the gift cards I may receive from someone or the money someone gives me for gas (donation) when out in service.  I'm not as good in these matters as most of you are, so there is definite need for improvement on my part.

 

A donation is a giving something to someone without receiving something in return. For example giving money to someone just because we want to help them out. It counts as income when we receive a service in exchange for that money. For example you clean my house and I give you $150. Then you would have to count that as income. 

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A donation is a giving something to someone without receiving something in return. For example giving money to someone just because we want to help them out. It counts as income when we receive a service in exchange for that money. For example you clean my house and I give you $150. Then you would have to count that as income. 

Well that cuts through the clutter (in my head!).  Makes sense - it's my new rule of thumb.

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But aren't you giving someone money out in service for providing a service too then? Like when they provide their car for you to drive in?  Wouldn't we have to count that money then?

 

There are some grey areas, but no I don't think that counts as income because you didn't hire them to drive you around, and they are not expecting compensation ( unless its coffee ).

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There are some grey areas, but no I don't think that counts as income because you didn't hire them to drive you around, and they are not expecting compensation ( unless its coffee ).

Thank you for your patience with me!  You've really helped to clarify somethings and I truly appreciate it!

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Thank you for your patience with me!  You've really helped to clarify somethings and I truly appreciate it!

 

 

I am happy to help. Like the saying goes "Docendo discimus". Helping others always makes me look at things from a new angle and improve my own knowledge of things.

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in new Zealand if we set ourselves up to look like a business then we are viewed and taxed as a business, so if for instance you are a window cleaner and you go help a brother or sister and receive anything in return for your services , even a gift card, that would be deemed taxable income. however if a brother or sister invited you for a cuppa that would not as that is common practice for many clients. if however you are not set up as window cleaner and you cleaned windows for someone without payment and they bought you a gift card this cannot be tagged to any tangible business venture and would be considered a gift. it's all in how it's engineered, if the brother said can you clean my windows and instead of paying you cash can I give you a gift, that is a contract and viewed as a legal entitlement and could be viewed as an income by some goVT. agencies.

so you know in your heart of hearts whether a transaction is to generate money on the side or if it is done as a gift. even a favor is an income if it is your means of making money. the only person who can violate your conscience is you.

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But aren't you giving someone money out in service for providing a service too then? Like when they provide their car for you to drive in?  Wouldn't we have to count that money then?

Just to further complicate matters, US only: You receive a contribution for gas from the group to help cover your car expenses. 

Not a problem, it is a gift.

When figuring your income tax you deduct 14 cents a mile for miles spent in service you have to deduct from your 14 cent per mile tax credit that contribution for charitable use of vehicle because you were partially reimbursed.

It gets complicated.

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