Jump to content
JWTalk - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

Recommended Posts

I wonder who names the streets in our territories. This afternoon we were on Black Joe Road. I'm guessing a well known blacksmith once lived there.  I remember a Street in new England named Rattlesnake Gutter Road.  I also recall a street in Maine called Tar Kiln Hill Road. Been on any interesting Streets lately? 


Edited by kejedo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jacksonville, Fl has named streets and they tend to run in "themes". You will have one neighborhood with all tree names, another with fruit names, another with people names, etc.

 

Gainesville, Fl, on the other hand, has "numbered" streets, so the names are like 13th Street, 6th Ave and suhc.

 

People from Gainesville find it hard to navigate Jacksonville because of the street names and no rhyme or reason why a particular are has the names it does so you need a map (or GPS) to know where those particular names are.

 

People from Jacksonville find it hard to navigate Gainesville because, since it is a numbered grid, it has "compass directions" with the street names - so, you will have NE13th Street, SE 13th Street, NW 13th Street and SW 13th Street. They get confused and wonder why there are four different streets with the same name.

 

Ocala, Fl has it's own differences - they have some streets like "24th Street Road" - why the double designation?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jacksonville, Fl has named streets and they tend to run in "themes". You will have one neighborhood with all tree names, another with fruit names, another with people names, etc.

 

Gainesville, Fl, on the other hand, has "numbered" streets, so the names are like 13th Street, 6th Ave and suhc.

 

People from Gainesville find it hard to navigate Jacksonville because of the street names and no rhyme or reason why a particular are has the names it does so you need a map (or GPS) to know where those particular names are.

 

People from Jacksonville find it hard to navigate Gainesville because, since it is a numbered grid, it has "compass directions" with the street names - so, you will have NE13th Street, SE 13th Street, NW 13th Street and SW 13th Street. They get confused and wonder why there are four different streets with the same name.

 

Ocala, Fl has it's own differences - they have some streets like "24th Street Road" - why the double designation?

My sister has lived in Gainesville, for 30 years. Whenever I visit, I am usually confused to the system. There are many roads that intersect in a diagonal , and I have trouble seeing that in my mind in a logical way. I guess my logic needs upgrading.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is one problem with long street names... :D

 

Emily Sue passed away and Billy Bob called 911. The 911 operator told Billy Bob that she would send someone out right away. 
Where do you live?" asked the operator. 
Billy Bob replied, "At the end of Eucalyptus Drive." 
The operator asked, "Can you spell that for me?" 
There was a long pause and finally Billy Bob said, "How 'bout if I drag her over to Oak Street and you pick her up there?" 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about when you are driving along the same road and it's called 'Silver' but you cross the town line and it's called 'Gold' for a few houses then it's 'Silver' again at the next town Iine. Makes RV's or DNC.'s interesting.

 

Do you have a road named 'Lead' that turns into 'Gold'?  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was doing mapping in Maine, I came across a small street called King’s Highway. It was partially black- topped, but mostly a dirt road. This street was lined by many trees including White PInes. By the 17th century, Great Britain had depleted its forests and looked to the tall, straight white pines of New England to supply timber for wooden ships, especially for masts. King Geoge 1 of England had a broad axe mark made on trees of groves dedicated for his export. Along the coasts of Maine, street corners were made round to allow the movement of these tall trees, and longer ships were built. So that little street was once part of a grove with the King’s mark. Ironically, almost everyone on the street was surnamed Grover. http://www.ccrpa.org/km/King%27s%20Mark%20Why%20The%20Name%20King%27s%20Mark.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used to live in Brampton, Ontario. The "old" section of the city was organized by letters of the alphabet, so you had the "J" section with streets such as Jeremy, Jordan, etc. We lived in a newer development with names such as Big Moe Cres, Zia Dotta Cres, Via Romano Way, Gallview Ln.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also in Maine, on my same job, I ran into a beautiful stone gate in Rumford. Locals call this development Brick Park. Legend is that the gate was filmed to be used in "Notting Hill" but landed on the cutting room floor. This community was a planned paper-mill town built in the 1880s by a Canadian man with Scottish ancestry. He named the community Strathglass after a River in Scotland. The streets also have Scottish roots like Lochness Road and Clachan Place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is no joke. There was a KH in Madrid in a street named "Hermandad de Donantes de Sangre" (Brotherhood of Blood Donors). Can you imagine a more unsuitable address for a KH?

 

It was closed not long ago, now they are attending a KH in calle Ámbar (Amber Street). Much better. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the first ten years of my life I lived on the Carboonstraat (Carbon Street). The streets to either side of us were the Steenstraat (Stone Street) and Mijnstraat (Mine Street). As you can probably guess, this was a coal mining area :) Oh, and one part of the Mijnstraat was refered to as the Yellow Way (Gele Weg), after the colour of the crushed gravel that made up the pavement. This portion of the street had no homes, just a farmer's field on one side and a slag hill on the other. That was part of my walk to school.

 

Then we moved to Acaciastraat, followed by Laurierstraat, and then to Canada.


Edited by Sylv
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A sister told me she was at an assembly some years ago when there was "tent city" for delgates. The tents were lined up as streets and the streets were named for books of the Bible. People put their trash out side the tents and it was picked up regularly.She said it was very organized. When we look at how confusing and senseless the naming of regular streets has been,it is amazing to know how organized our brothers are with just cloth roofs.  'The tent of God....' :bible2:    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

About JWTalk.net - Jehovah's Witnesses Online Community

Since 2006, JWTalk has proved to be a well-moderated online community for real Jehovah's Witnesses on the web. However, our community is not an official website of Jehovah's Witnesses. It is not endorsed, sponsored, or maintained by any legal entity used by Jehovah's Witnesses. We are a pro-JW community maintained by brothers and sisters around the world. We expect all community members to be active publishers in their congregations, therefore, please do not apply for membership if you are not currently one of Jehovah's Witnesses.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

JWTalk 22.12.4 (changelog)