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4 billion years: World's oldest fossils unearthed


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https://phys.org/news/2017-03-world-oldest-fossils-unearthed.html

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/03/01/fossils-from-northern-quebec-could-be-earliest-evidence-of-life-on-earth.html

 

Scientist have found fossil remains of bacteria at least 3,770 million years old, but they say they could be as old as 4,280 million years old. At that time there was no dry land yet on earth and apparently those bacteria thrived in the volcanic vents in the bottom of the oceans.

 

If those calculations are correct, their dates pose one interesting question: how did life evolve so quickly? The age of planet earth is calculated around 4,500 million years, and yet only 200 hundred million years later there were perfectly formed and completely functional bacteria. Too many coincidences and too little time for trial and error.

 

Another article from that same website shows that 3.7 billion years ago microbial life was already diverse. Not only did life appear too quickly, but it also evolved into many different forms too quickly. Unless it was created that way... :whistling:

 

 

 

 

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Excellent points Carlos! (tu)

How ironic that many scientists approve of the current scientific dating methods and praise how highly accurate they are and yet if their dating methods are correct, then how could certain forms of life have developed so fast based on their dates? They are in a big dilemma!

 

And if life evolved that quickly millions of years ago, why aren't we seeing this great evolutionary speed today?

Edited by Beggar for the Spirit
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6 hours ago, carlos said:

https://phys.org/news/2017-03-world-oldest-fossils-unearthed.html

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/03/01/fossils-from-northern-quebec-could-be-earliest-evidence-of-life-on-earth.html

 

Scientist have found fossil remains of bacteria at least 3,770 million years old, but they say they could be as old as 4,280 million years old. At that time there was no dry land yet on earth and apparently those bacteria thrived in the volcanic vents in the bottom of the oceans.

 

If those calculations are correct, their dates pose one interesting question: how did life evolve so quickly? The age of planet earth is calculated around 4,500 million years, and yet only 200 hundred million years later there were perfectly formed and completely functional bacteria. Too many coincidences and too little time for trial and error.

 

Another article from that same website shows that 3.7 billion years ago microbial life was already diverse. Not only did life appear too quickly, but it also evolved into many different forms too quickly. Unless it was created that way... :whistling:

 

 

 

 

Yep ... The growth from the tiny bacteria to an elephant ...would require turbo speed!

Perhaps bacteria had Gym membership and worked out? protein bars?  Who knows? :lol1:

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I recently decided I need to read something about organic chemistry and genetics, since I don't know anything. I mean, I know what I studied at school, DNA, genes, chromosomes, all of that, but they are just rather obscure concepts for me, I can't really visualize they way they work.

 

So a few days ago I began by studying what amino acids are. They are molecules that share a common structure based on carbon plus a specific part that makes them different. Like this:

 

amino-acid-structure.jpg.fc511a5f132116438b27de6b96307b83.jpg

 

All amino acids share that structure except for the R part, which is which makes every one different. And what is so special about this? That one of their ends is positively loaded with the other is negatively loaded, so they can easily "connect" with other amino acids. It's like they were shaped as the pieces of a puzzle. Several amino acids can so be connected and form a long chain.

 

When the correct amino acids are joined in the right way and with the right turns, they make up a protein. Proteins, in turn, are the bricks with which cells are built. To give you an idea of how complex a protein is, have a look at this:

 

protein.jpg.1adf5fa459aa7ab05e247f1c82b55e1e.jpg

 

There exist over 500 known amino acids, but only 20 are present in cell tissues. Besides, depending on the way its atoms are placed they can be left-handed or right-handed. But proteins are only built from left-handed amino acids.

 

So for the first protein to form, something (a lightning striking the water surface, fantasize evolutionist molecular chemists) had to produce the necessary amino acids but:

- they had to be exclusively of the twenty varieties necessary for life, and no one else.

- there couldn't be any less or more, just the exact number.

- they all had to be left-handed (in experiments they are always 50% left-handed, 50% right-handed).

- they all had to join exactly in the required order and with the required shape.

 

And in case this doesn't seem impossible enough, this had to happen several million times exactly in the same spot and one after the other so that all those proteins could combine into something that resembled a basic cell.

 

Do you really think that's science or is it rather a fairy tale?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by carlos
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Interestingly, Douglas Axe has worked on the possibility of a functioning protein resulting from 150 amino acids, compared with the possible combinations.

 

Quote

If we are talking about sequences of 150 amino acids capable of folding into “function-ready” structures, compared to all possible sequences of that length, Axe determined the ratio to be 1 to 10to the power of 74. Axe told Steve Meyer that the odds of finding a functional protein by random mutation are far lower than the odds of finding a given atom out of all the atoms in our galaxy. 

Quote from Darwin's House Of Cards by Tom Bethell.

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