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Lets Talk About Rice

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Can we talk about rice? Please?

 

I prefer long grain, fluffy rice. Had a wonderful side of Greek rice with my chicken Souvlaki in a Greek restaurant some friends took me to in Canada a couple years ago. I still dream about that meal. Loved it so much I found out how to make the rice.

 

I make rice with bone broth for my dog food.

 

I make Mexican rice the sisters taught me to make when they were here for the KH build a couple years ago.

 

What is your favorite rice dish? Is there any casseroles with rice? How do you make it for a side dish? Creamy? Tomato-y?

 

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I particularly love rice, and eat it almost daily, since I tend to avoid gluten. But just the other day I read this article that shows that rice contains high levels of arsenic and mercury, since it ‘accumulates toxic metals from fertilizers, pesticides, the soil, the rocks and the water from which it is grown’. http://www.businessinsider.com/gluten-free-diet-arsenic-mercury-2017-3/#-2

Ordinarily I would have been thrilled by this topic, but now I’m going to have to learn about recipes that don’t use rice, because, not surprisingly, of my elevated levels of mercury. The article does, however, say that 'the safest rice of all is white basmati rice from California, India, or Pakistan'. Hope that helps.

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3 hours ago, Motherhen said:

Ordinarily I would have been thrilled by this topic, but now I’m going to have to learn about recipes that don’t use rice

Not necessarily Katrina.  I was reading a while back of ways to reduce heavy metals by cooking rice in a specific way.  I too am fond of rice based dishes, and was wondering how Japan and other Asian and Middle Eastern cultures do it.

 

But I found these points from a quick search just now which may help:

  • Arsenic occurs naturally in the environment, but rice tends to absorb it more than other cereal crops and also takes it up from pesticides in soil and industrial toxins.  There is inorganic arsenic, which is a carcinogen and organic arsenic, which is less toxic but still of concern.
  • Scientists claim rice should be steeped in water overnight to flush out the poison, and then it can be rinsed and cooked the next day.
  • Using this method, the arsenic levels were cut by 80 per cent.
  • Many of the white rice products tested had fairly low levels of arsenic, and in the context of a few servings a week for an adult, it’s probably not an issue. Rice should not be served to infants or pregnant ladies (I never knew this, too late!)
  • Brown rice, on the other hand, has significantly more arsenic than white rice and should be avoided or consumed rarely.

http://www.themercury.com.au/lifestyle/food/how-we-are-all-cooking-rice-incorrectly-and-could-be-endangering-our-health/news-story/839e5e0c8fbc14694e3ebca7c91dfbd5

 

This article concludes with some good advice:

"while rice may contribute an unsafe level of arsenic, it’s certainly not the only source in our diet, and we need to be cautious about demonizing an entire class of food based on a soundbite from a news story. While I don’t think rice is a necessary component of a healthy diet, I do think it can be incorporated safely as a source of starch: just be sure to pay attention to the brand you’re buying, as well as your method of preparation."

(again Californian rice was mentioned)

https://chriskresser.com/arsenic-in-rice-how-concerned-should-you-be/

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1 hour ago, hatcheckgirl said:

 

  • Scientists claim rice should be steeped in water overnight to flush out the poison, and then it can be rinsed and cooked the next day.
  • Using this method, the arsenic levels were cut by 80 per cent.
  • Many of the white rice products tested had fairly low levels of arsenic, and in the context of a few servings a week for an adult, it’s probably not an issue. Rice should not be served to infants or pregnant ladies (I never knew this, too late!)
  • Brown rice, on the other hand, has significantly more arsenic than white rice and should be avoided or consumed rarely.

 

Thank you for your research, Lucy. I'll try soaking the rice over night and eating more white basmati. My arsenic levels used to be high years ago, but they're normal, now, after cutting out rice milk and rice cakes. I've been trying to chelate the mercury, but wasn't have much success, so I thought maybe it was because of the rice.

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I use, almost exclusively, Basmati rice. I do like Jasmine but the fluffiest is Basmati. And I watch it that I don't buy imported from asian countries, which have less environmental control. Your idea of soaking it is now going to become a habit for me, just in case.

I do love rice but I have to be careful of the carbs so I consume a few times a week is all, maybe 2.

 

That said lets talk about dishes. I get a hankering for burritos all the time. But the tortilla is not good for me. So I'll make up taco meat, refried beans (even the dehydrated bean is good, seems to be less gassy) or will pop a jar of home canned black bean and mash them with some cumin, add rice and cheese, lettuce, tomato and green onion. Topped with green salsa and sour cream. Sounds like a mountain huh? Can be! Lew loves it, he takes tortilla chips and treats it like a dip. 

 

This is but one meal I make what about you?

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I like Basmati rice too. It's the only one recommended for me for diabeties by my dietician. My portion size is supposed to be half cup cooked rice, but no way I stick to that! :no:

 

Here's a Greek recipe using normal white rice, mince and plenty of ripe tomatoes. Brown off the mince and fry with onion and garlic. Meanwhile scoop out the flesh of 8 tomatoes, chop and add to mince. Season and add herbs, chopped oregano and parsley.  Cook until the liquid reduces a little. Add half a cup of uncooked rice. 

 

When you scooped  out the tomatoes, leave the top as a lid still attached. Sprinkle a little sugar in the bottom. Oil an oven proof dish, and pour a little water to coveR the bottom, add also a couple of tablespoons of the mince mixture. Stuff the tomatoes with the mince mixture. Peel and slice potatoes in thick wedges and place around the tomatoes. A little olive oil over the lot. Bake for about 30-45 mins until potatoes are cooked and the rice is cooked as well. That is why don't overlook the mince - the rice will absorb the mince mixture liquid.

 

This dish is called Tomates Yimesta, 'stuffed tomatoes', and you can stuff capsicum too. Yum!

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Cilantro chutney is simple to make, keeps well in the refrigerator, and goes great with rice. There are a few variations, but this is the basic recipe:

 

Cilantro Chutney

Ingredients:

2 cups chopped coriander (cilantro)

1 cup chopped mint leaves (optional)

1 T. chopped green chile

1 small onion

Juice of 1 lemon or lime

1 T. chopped fresh ginger

1 T. chopped garlic, peeled

2 T. desiccated coconut (optional)

Salt to taste

Sweeten with a little sugar if desired

 

·        Mix and blend all ingredients thoroughly in a mixer to make a paste.

·        Add a little olive oil if needed.

Some recipes call for a little cumin as well, and the best part is that cilantro helps to remove mercury.

 

Edited by Motherhen

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Lucy and Karina, those are great. You have me thinking out of my box! I would never have chosen them. Now I can't wait to try them. I have lots of Cilantro right now oh and tomato too so I guess I'll make a little of each.

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The coriander (cilantro) is used very often in Asian and Middle Eastern dishes.  How useful to know it helps with removing mercury!  Because, as I said earlier, they eat a bucket load of rice every day!  I was wondering how they manage their mercury intake.  I was reading that chlorella taken with fish with high levels of mercury, such as sushi tuna/salmon etc, helps bind the mercury before it can be absorbed, then safely excreted.  Maybe that is something to also consider? (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/01/04/sushi-ingredients.aspx)

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I've been cooking, exclusively with Indian basmati rice for years.  I eat it as a base with African stews. But, lately I've been creating my own stir-fry recipes using cubed meat, curry spices, garlic, onions, veggies while cooking this in coconut oil.  Sometimes I like a little "heat" to my dishes so I'll add some cayenne pepper, chili powder or chitpole.

 

Oh great...now I'm hungry! :wacko: :chef:

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Look, I have to admit it, despite reading up and having it reminded here via Karina's post regarding pre-soaking the rice to help eliminate mercury, I don't find I am doing it.  Firstly, I forget, because you should really be doing it for hours - that means organisation.  Secondly, I like the absorption method of cooking rice (both on the stove and in microwave with rice cooker).  But I boiled it today instead in plenty of water.  Tasted gross!  It was just mushy after soaking and boiling.  I like fluffy rice.  Dilemma! 

 

Edited by hatcheckgirl

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On 3/25/2017 at 8:37 PM, MentalProject said:

I like rice salad. My mum one that is amazing. 

 

Something similar to this :-Perfect brown rice salad

Thanks, I did a screen shot. We have lunch weekly at our meeting for field service on Wednesday. I have to figure out the measurements, and, double it! 

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Irony of ironies, 2 weeks after I posted this topic I became aware I was allergic, extremely so, to almost everything I was eating and commenting on here. Boo!

I now live a life of few food selections but am feeling so much better. And the physical symptoms associated with it has gone away. Took almost a year to get to this point.

 

But I'm reminiscing as I read, oh and drooling

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So called instant brown rice is what i used mostly. Oh my,  i use that stuff?  I must be mad. But it turns out great for me all the time.

 

Is there so much arsenic in rice that its a concern?  Huh. Who'd have thought?  I grew up with the idea that white rice is just fluff, thus me going for brown rice.

 

I have boiled rice a couple times and it turned out fine. But I never soaked it first and rinsed it afterwards. 

 

Be careful of fake rice.  Do an internet search to see to what lengths some people go to to make fake food. Its crazy. But now they call it fake news to cover it all up and that should make you feel safe. Right?

 

 

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Lately I have been trying to cook with rice more as I was getting in a pasta rut. Last night I made a creamy vegetable soup over rice, and later this week I will be making a vegetarian red beans and rice and a cauliflower with greens (kale, spinach, bok choy) risotto.

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