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1 hour ago, TonyWenz said:

Oh yes thanks.  I don't think I can delete this now?   Still miscellaneous is a handy place to post anything at all.  If anyone has an odd thought that pops into their head.  I don't have one at the moment :D

 

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41 minutes ago, Naturale said:

Oh yes thanks.  I don't think I can delete this now?   Still miscellaneous is a handy place to post anything at all.  If anyone has an odd thought that pops into their head.  I don't have one at the moment :D

 

GD.gif.c896606c9d7f6519599bb7261612f56a.gif

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You are welcome to continue here of course.

 

However, there even is also an 'Off Topic Thread', as well. For example, someone hates Tapioca Pudding, you got flies, I got worms....

 

But I wouldn't read the whole thread. It could damage your brain, ie doing it all in one go.

 

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url=https://jwtalk.net/forums/topic/21322-my-off-topic-thread/&share_tid=21322&share_fid=69068&share_type=t

 

My off topic thread

 

Oh, and some are very 'Off'

Just Older

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, TonyWenz said:

You are welcome to continue here of course.

 

However, there even is also an 'Off Topic Thread', as well. For example, someone hates Tapioca Pudding, you got flies, I got worms.... emoji2373.png

 

But I wouldn't read the whole thread. It could damage your brain, ie doing it all in one go.

 

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url=https://jwtalk.net/forums/topic/21322-my-off-topic-thread/&share_tid=21322&share_fid=69068&share_type=t

 

My off topic thread

 

Oh, and some are very 'Off'

Just Older emoji856.png

 

 

 

 

It's ok my brain is already damaged :)

Edited by Naturale
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15 hours ago, TonyWenz said:

However, there even is also an 'Off Topic Thread', as well. 

But I wouldn't read the whole thread. It could damage your brain, ie doing it all in one go.

My off topic thread

Oh, and some are very 'Off'

Susanna, don't listen to that old guy, the old "My off topic" thread is full of fun and informative comments.

We'll make your thread 'My off-topic thread part deux' :lol1:

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I was reading a thread about favorite board (tabletop?) games, and remembered the old Bible Character cards.

I wouldn't classify it as a tabletop game, though, besides, the thought that came to my mind would have been off-topic there.

So, I thought of this thread. Besides, I am new, and by the time this comment shows up, the discussion will have long past up my post, and no one will ever read this.

So, here goes... (I'm rusty on the details ... but I will forgive myself...)

 

A witness family often played games, especially Bible games, together. One of the favorites was the Bible Character Cards.

One card was "Who wrote the first 5 books of the Bible?" The next clue was "the son of Amram and Jocabed".

 

So, one day, the 10 year old son in this family was out in the ministry with his Dad.

A man answered the door and looked down at the boy. The boy introduced himself and asked "Would you like to get to know your Bible better?"

The man at the door said, "son, how old are you?"  (the young publisher answered)

Then the man said, "I've been reading the Bible since I was your age, what could you possible teach me about the Bible? Do you know who wrote the first 5 books of the Bible?"

 

The young publisher said, "The son  of Amram and Jocabed!"

 

Good job, me! (applause emoji)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Groundhog Day:
Animals predicting the weather was adapted from German culture when settlers arrived in the U.S. and chose Pennsylvania as their home. The old Candlemas Day tradition in Germany involved members of the clergy distributing blessed candles which were used to determine how long the winter weather would last. Animals were also observed to see how long their hibernation periods lasted. Germans closely tracked badgers and found groundhogs to be the next best thing. 

 

*** g70 1/22 p. 11 Candlemas—A Holiday That Contradicts ***
According to The Catholic Encyclopedia, Candlemas, which falls on February 2, is a day set aside to honor the purification of the Virgin Mary. It is to recall Mary’s obeying God’s law by going to the temple in Jerusalem and offering a sacrifice of purification after she bore Jesus. (Luke 2:21-24; Lev. 12:1-4) How strange! The Catholic church teaches that Mary was sinless when she conceived Jesus, yet sets aside a day to honor her performance of an act that proves that she was not sinless but was imperfect, as are all the descendants of Adam.—Rom. 3:23; 5:12.
 

Edited by Tortuga
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Knocking on Wood:
Ancient pagans used to believe that there spirits living the trees and knocking on the trunks would summon them for protection. The gesture was also used to thank them when something good happened. The tradition later took shape in other cultures. Some Christians associated the tradition with the cross and Jews associated it with knocking on the wooden doors of synagogues while seeking shelter during the Spanish Inquisition.

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On 12/27/2018 at 3:21 PM, Tortuga said:

 

  • ie pp. 5-7 - When We Die (ie)     (1998)

Immortality of the Soul—The Birth of the Doctrine 

 

8 Various ancient civilizations, then, held one teaching in common—the immortality of the soul. Did they get this teaching from the same source?

The Point of Origin

9. Which religion influenced the ancient world of Egypt, Persia, and Greece?

 

 “In the ancient world,” says the book The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, “Egypt, Persia, and Greece felt the influence of the Babylonian religion.” This book goes on to explain: “In view of the early contact between Egypt and Babylonia, as revealed by the El-Amarna tablets, there were certainly abundant opportunities for the infusion of Babylonian views and customs into Egyptian cults. In Persia, the Mithra cult reveals the unmistakable influence of Babylonian conceptions . . . The strong admixture of Semitic elements both in early Greek mythology and in Grecian cults is now so generally admitted by scholars as to require no further comment. These Semitic elements are to a large extent more specifically Babylonian.”*

10, 11. What was the Babylonian view of life after death?

10 But does not the Babylonian view of what happens after death differ considerably from that of the Egyptians, the Persians, and the Greeks? Consider, for example, the BabylonianEpic of Gilgamesh. Its aging hero, Gilgamesh, haunted by the reality of death, sets out in search of immortality but fails to find it. A wine maiden he meets during his journey even encourages him to make the most of this life, for he will not find the unending life he seeks. The message of the whole epic is that death is inevitable and the hope of immortality is an illusion. Would this indicate that the Babylonians did not believe in the Hereafter?

11 Professor Morris Jastrow, Jr., of the University of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., wrote: “Neither the people nor the leaders of religious thought [of Babylonia] ever faced the possibility of the total annihilation of what once was called into existence. Death [in their view] was a passage to another kind of life, and the denial of immortality merely emphasized the impossibility of escaping the change in existence brought about by death.” Yes, the Babylonians also believed that life of some kind, in some form, continued after death. They expressed this by burying objects with the dead for their use in the Hereafter.

12-14. (a) After the Flood, what was the birthplace of the teaching of the immortality of the soul? (b) How did the doctrine spread across the earth?

12 Clearly, the teaching of the immortality of the soul goes back to ancient Babylon. According to the Bible, a book bearing the stamp of accurate history, the city of Babel, or Babylon, was founded by Nimrod, a great-grandson of Noah.* After the global Flood in Noah’s day, there was only one language and one religion. By founding the city and constructing a tower there, Nimrod started another religion. The Bible record shows that after the confusion of languages at Babel, the unsuccessful tower builders scattered and made new beginnings, taking along their religion. (Genesis 10:6-10; 11:4-9) Babylonishreligious teachings thus spread across the face of the earth.

13 Tradition has it that Nimrod died a violent death. After his death the Babylonians reasonably would have been inclined to hold him in high regard as the founder, builder, and first king of their city. Since the god Marduk (Merodach) was regarded as the founder of Babylon, some scholars have suggested that Marduk represents the deified Nimrod. If this is so, then the idea that a person has a soul that survives death must have been current at least by the time of Nimrod’s death. In any case, the pages of history reveal that following the Flood, the birthplace of the teaching of the immortality of the soul was Babel, or Babylon.

14 How, though, did the doctrine become central to most religions of our time? The next section will examine its entry into Eastern religions.

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