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Global insects reduction


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Yet more evidence that this system is unsustainable.

 

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The study says that bees, ants and beetles are disappearing eight times faster than mammals, birds or reptiles.

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The researchers found that declines in almost all regions may lead to the extinction of 40% of insects over the next few decades. One-third of insect species are classed as Endangered.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-47198576

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Thank you for this topic, I was just today considering starting it myself. I am 50 years old and my own observations seem to confirm the claim of a 60% reduction in insect life. This is by far more terrifying and deeply saddening to me than just about any other thing I’ve seen. In my youth insect swarms were a nuisance that my father cursed as he cleaned windshields and bumpers of the family cars. Now , even living in an agricultural area, I won’t so much a kill a dangerous spider. I just can’t bring myself to harm any creature that I don’t intend to eat. Even a mosquito. And with people being the pathetic creatures they often are I occasionally find myself having a strong reaction to the casual disregard for living things some display. 

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3 hours ago, Mykyl said:

remember as a kid rolling over stones and watching all kinds of creatures running for cover. Today you can roll over a stone and find nothing there. Feel sad for my youngest kids who have not really seen proper garden wildlife of any kind.

You know what.. you are right. Now that you mention it, I remember the same, but thinking back to my recent gardening and landscaping attempts, I don't recall seeing too much of anything. 

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I know there is concern about the loss of bees worldwide - bees are responsible for more pollination that any other single method. Jehovah will correct this problem.

 

However, living where I do in Florida, we have not noticed any decline in insects. They are still bothersome when you are trying to do things outside, deafening on a warm evening and need to b cleaned off the windshield.

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Man is totally to blame.

 

"By a large margin, habitat change -- deforestation, urbanisation, conversion to farmland -- emerged as the biggest cause of insect decline and extinction threat.

Next was pollution and the widespread use of pesticides in commercial agriculture." https://www.sbs.com.au/news/plummeting-insect-numbers-threaten-catastrophic-collapse-of-nature

 

The article gives the example of France: "The recent collapse, for example, of many bird species in France was traced to the use insecticides on industrial crops such as wheat, barley, corn and wine grapes."

 

Man is so shortsighted - with insects declining, other species also are affected in the knock-on.

 

"Only decisive action can avert a catastrophic collapse of nature's ecosystems," the authors cautioned.

Restoring wilderness areas and a drastic reduction in the use of pesticides and chemical fertiliser are likely the best way to slow the insect loss, they said.

 

Waiting for humans to fix this - not going to happen.  Rev 11:18

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35 minutes ago, Qapla said:

I know there is concern about the loss of bees worldwide - bees are responsible for more pollination that any other single method. Jehovah will correct this problem.

 

However, living where I do in Florida, we have not noticed any decline in insects. They are still bothersome when you are trying to do things outside, deafening on a warm evening and need to b cleaned off the windshield.

I’m very happy for you. It’s why I’m hiking through big cypress in March 

20 minutes ago, hatcheckgirl said:

Man is totally to blame.

 

"By a large margin, habitat change -- deforestation, urbanisation, conversion to farmland -- emerged as the biggest cause of insect decline and extinction threat.

Next was pollution and the widespread use of pesticides in commercial agriculture." https://www.sbs.com.au/news/plummeting-insect-numbers-threaten-catastrophic-collapse-of-nature

 

The article gives the example of France: "The recent collapse, for example, of many bird species in France was traced to the use insecticides on industrial crops such as wheat, barley, corn and wine grapes."

 

Man is so shortsighted - with insects declining, other species also are affected in the knock-on.

 

"Only decisive action can avert a catastrophic collapse of nature's ecosystems," the authors cautioned.

Restoring wilderness areas and a drastic reduction in the use of pesticides and chemical fertiliser are likely the best way to slow the insect loss, they said.

 

Waiting for humans to fix this - not going to happen.  Rev 11:18

I think it’s already too late. Nothing less than a catastrophic purge of man will now correct the problems. It’s ugly but true. 

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5 hours ago, Qapla said:

I know there is concern about the loss of bees worldwide - bees are responsible for more pollination that any other single method. Jehovah will correct this problem.

 

However, living where I do in Florida, we have not noticed any decline in insects. They are still bothersome when you are trying to do things outside, deafening on a warm evening and need to b cleaned off the windshield.

When I lived in Fl I noticed a big decline in the swarms of love bugs and when I go back to Coquina beach, there aren’t as many coquinas which makes me sad.  Maybe the pesky ones have increased because the beneficial bugs have declined?

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On 2/11/2019 at 10:50 PM, BLEmom said:

When I lived in Fl I noticed a big decline in the swarms of love bugs

 

And this is a bad thing ?

 

On 2/11/2019 at 10:50 PM, BLEmom said:

Maybe the pesky ones have increased because the beneficial bugs have declined?

 

:eek:  Love Bugs ARE pesky ones ... 

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Just saw this on our news. It's all timely. They say in 10 years we might be facing a mass extincition event if we don't act now. Without the insects, such as bees, that are vital to keeping the eco system going, we lose all our food and so on.

 

If that is only in a potential 10 years, how far is the end of this system? And it's not the only threat, in a few years they say our medications such as anti-biotics won't work, because the viruses are adapting to them, and thus in a few years, 10 million people a year may start dying from once treatable illnesses. Jehovah said he will have to step in or "no flesh would be saved". And now also we have the offical announcment of KOTN by the Slave. It's all happening at once.


Edited by EccentricM
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18 hours ago, Qapla said:

 

And this is a bad thing ?

 

 

:eek:  Love Bugs ARE pesky ones ... 

The last 2 times I drove to Louisiana those love bugs where everywhere. They covered my bumper, hood, windshield and side mirrors.

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  • 2 months later...

Have any of you seen lightening bugs lately? 

 

While growing up, we used to catch them and put them in jars to look at for a while. The jars had holes in the lid and they were released after a while, we just liked looking at them. 

 

Even when I moved to my current location, there were tons of them in the evenings. It was a beautiful sight to look into the woods behind my house and see them lighting up within the trees. 

 

I just realized while drawing pictures of bugs with my daughter that I haven't seen them in a very long time. Possibly years. I have no idea if they are dwindling everywhere or just where I live. Either way, it's sad. 

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12 hours ago, Saffron said:

Have any of you seen lightening bugs lately? 

 

While growing up, we used to catch them and put them in jars to look at for a while. The jars had holes in the lid and they were released after a while, we just liked looking at them. 

 

Even when I moved to my current location, there were tons of them in the evenings. It was a beautiful sight to look into the woods behind my house and see them lighting up within the trees. 

 

I just realized while drawing pictures of bugs with my daughter that I haven't seen them in a very long time. Possibly years. I have no idea if they are dwindling everywhere or just where I live. Either way, it's sad. 

Yes, when I was a kid I would see them in our backyard during the warmer months. Now I couldn’t tell you the last time I saw just one.

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On 2/11/2019 at 6:23 PM, BenJepthah said:

I’m very happy for you. It’s why I’m hiking through big cypress in March 

 

So, talk about pesky..did you see the recent story about the giant python with 73 eggs in it?..that was found in Big Cypress..I was there shortly before it was found..so glad I didn't encounter her!..I would be VERY careful..lol

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On 4/27/2019 at 10:39 PM, Wanda Hill said:

So, talk about pesky..did you see the recent story about the giant python with 73 eggs in it?..that was found in Big Cypress..I was there shortly before it was found..so glad I didn't encounter her!..I would be VERY careful..lol

I left the week before. On my hike through BC I found the trail of a massive python just north of the camp area called frog hammock. The track was as deep as my own . I weigh about 250 . The track was right in the trail and very fresh with clear scale impressions and about four inches wide . From it I estimate a snake about 16-18’ .  They tend to lay in wait along trails for deer and other animals so that snake was probably just a few yards away.

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On ‎2‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 12:30 AM, BenJepthah said:

I’d like to mention another thing they tend to miss or ignore.  Estrogenic compounds from birth control and plastic  in the water supply . This has to be skewing the reproductive abilities of invertebrates and vertebrates alike. 

Good point, I never thought about that. You often hear about this issue but only in the context of how it affects people. Nobody has ever spoken about the effect it might have on animals, particularly insects. 

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By the way, when 5G comes I could imagine the situation will become worse. All this bluepilling and calming the masses by media and "fact-checking sites" is based on as little fact as the worries. Nobody, nobody has actually examined the implications on wildlife and plantlife and dangers of cancer. Especially not the FCC. The facts will be established when the 5G thing goes into mass rollout. Insects have been proven to be sensitive to the radio-waves we are using NOW, from ordinary FM frequencies to mobile phone frequencies. My hunch is that 5G is going to confuse them even more.

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Then again, 5G could help ... it could be just as likely that 5G is beyond the frequencies that affect them as that they are susceptible to them.

 

I am sure that they are just the same as most living creatures. There are some frequencies that are too low for them to detect while there are others that are too high.

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