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New York proposes to decriminalize prostitution


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I can't find the article on that site, but based on the link - there is talk of decriminalizing sex work in New York?

 

Well, you are talking to a guy who lives in Nevada and that is legal here. There is a brothel about 50 miles from where I live. This has been legal in Nevada for decades. I don't think it is going to change or affect your life much if they do legalize it. It's just one more proof we are in the last days, eh.

 

You know it's sad, most date just for sex and that is obviously legal, but not moral. It's crazy the world we are in. No wonder many of us are anxious to go home to the real life. We just have to wait and stay busy until Jehovah is ready to end this system and start the New System.  :pray:

 

Stay busy and the time will go by faster.

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17 minutes ago, Thesauron said:


I don’t know what to address though. I don’t click on links without any kind of explanation what it is.

A Look at the Debate Over Decriminalizing Sex Work in New York

 

Nearly a hundred sex workers and former sex workers rallied in Albany on Tuesday to call for decriminalization of their work.

 

But there is no bill yet to fully decriminalize sex work. Brooklyn State Sen. Julia Salazar says she is working on it and these other bills are a good first step.

 

Critics say decriminalizing sex work is the wrong direction for New York.


Edited by Shawnster
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From Wiki  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decriminalization

Decriminalization or decriminalisation is the lessening of criminal penalties in relation to certain acts, perhaps retroactively, though perhaps regulated permits or fines might still apply (for contrast, see: legalization). The term was coined by anthropologist Jenifer James to express sex workers' movements' 'goals of removing laws used to target prostitutes'.[1] The reverse process is criminalization.

Decriminalization reflects changing social and moral views. A society may come to the view that an act is not harmful, should no longer be criminalized, or is otherwise not a matter to be addressed by the criminal justice system. Examples of subject matter which have been the subject of changing views on criminality over time in various societies and countries include:

In a federal country, acts may be decriminalized by one level of government while still subject to penalties levied by another; for example, possession of a decriminalized drug may still be subject to criminal charges by one level of government, but another may yet impose a monetary fine. This should be contrasted with legalization, which removes all or most legal detriments from a previously illegal act. It has also been noted that while some acts have been decriminalised, such as homosexuality and adultery, others have increased in their criminalization, such as familial sexual activities, or incest.[3]

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A Look at the Debate Over Decriminalizing Sex Work in New York
 
Nearly a hundred sex workers and former sex workers rallied in Albany on Tuesday to call for decriminalization of their work.
 
But there is no bill yet to fully decriminalize sex work. Brooklyn State Sen. Julia Salazar says she is working on it and these other bills are a good first step.
 
Critics say decriminalizing sex work is the wrong direction for New York.

Isn’t either way a political decision? I mean, it is legal in some places, and strictly prohibited in some of Satan’s old world. Some criminalise the buyer, some the seller, some both.
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8 minutes ago, Thesauron said:


Isn’t either way a political decision? I mean, it is legal in some places, and strictly prohibited in some of Satan’s old world. Some criminalise the buyer, some the seller, some both.

Yes, it's a political decision, like abortion or homosexual marriage.  Sometimes political decisions involve morality.  

 

As a Christian we would not have an opinion either way on the legalization of prostitution.  That is a legal or political matter.

 

However, as a Christian, we can point out how laws are changed as morals grow more and more lax.  Prostitution was considered illegal because the laws of the US were originally founded along moral standards that were felt to be in harmony with scripture.  This proposal to change the law is a symptom of the growing distance between society and Bible standards.

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Prostitution was considered illegal because the laws of the US were originally founded along moral standards that were felt to be in harmony with scripture.  This proposal to change the law is a symptom of the growing distance between society and Bible standards.

Are you sure? The view on prostitution has fluctuated with public opinion quite a lot in the past in many areas of the world. They live by their standards, we live by ours.
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The next step: Decriminalize pedophilia. There are already some pedophiles demanding it. (They say it's a sexual preference, and should be accepted by society.)
 
And people doubt we're living in the last days?

No, that doesn’t usually follow a decriminalisation.
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Decriminalising something has had a history of lessening it.

 

There are counties that have made all drugs, including narcotics, legal. The result was a marked decrease in addiction rates and an increase in treatment for addiction; as well as a marked drop in the price of drugs. If they can buy their hit legally, there's less need to turn to crime to pay for the habit, less power for the dealers and drug lords.

 

Countries like France have wine as part of the diet. There are laws, but it doesn't stop anyone at the dinner table; and the result is a low level of alcoholism, or driving while drunk. They learn how to handle it as they grow up; so they know how when they become legal.

 

There have been morality based laws before, such as Prohibition. it stopped nobody from getting a drink, and it made the criminals rich. The Mob ran the table, armed with a limitless supply of cash, from an unenforceable law. (Not for nothing, but there's never been a time when writing a 'morality' law has worked. And the world doesn't exactly have any kind of moral authority with regards to vice.) Repealing the Prohibition Law was the best defence against crime they had. 

 

However you slice it, sex is the 21st century vice, and it's an unenforceable law. Escorts and Brothels still advertise in the yellow pages; and that's not going to change until the world does. (And even that is a joke. The Victorian Era was the most repressed society in modern history, and a huge proportion of women had to support themselves with some form of sex work; because the culture didn't allow them to have any kind of job beyond being a housewife)

 

Sex workers today have a higher rate of abuse than most any other demographic. Some of them are addicted to drugs by their Pimps, some face violence from their clients... And what are they going to do? Go to a cop?

 

I'm a Christian. I have the same view on sex outside of marriage as anyone else here, but if we met one of those women in the field, and they became convinced that they were in a bad business, would they be able to leave? If their line of work is legal, they have legal protections. Something that can save some lives; get them health care, and warning about STD's... All things that they can't ask for now.

 

(Side Note: Statistics say that there has been a huge increase in domestic violence among ethnic minorities in America over the last year and a half. Why? Because they're scared that, in this climate, they'll be deported if they report the abuse to a cop. They can't afford a hospital, and feel it's safer to get beaten up than to ask for help. Sex workers are living that life every day.)

 

EDIT: Also, one further thought, JW's have a more conservative position on sex than most any other group; but never once have we demanded the laws change to make pre-martial sex illegal. Our position is simple: If you don't approve of something, don't do it. It's the same position that we'd take on decriminalising gambling, drinking, and any other vice else you care to name. The people who want that vice are always going to find it, and the people who don't, won't care what the law is.

 

Like it or not, this is the 21st Century version of Prohibition.

 


Edited by Thomas Walker
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Wow so many crazy things in the news... First it started with adding women in the military, abortions past 6 months, and making recreational drugs legal... Lately, I've been seeing people trying to start even crazier petitions : Legalize prostitution, pedophilia, marry animals & ghosts, and even make rape legal at certain locations depending on how someone dresses or acts..

 

And we though this world was psycho already! 

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Wow so many crazy things in the news... First it started with adding women in the military, abortions past 6 months, and making recreational drugs legal... Lately, I've been seeing people trying to start even crazier petitions : Legalize prostitution, pedophilia, marry animals & ghosts, and even make rape legal at certain locations depending on how someone dresses or acts..
 
And we though this world was psycho already! 

What is crazy about adding women in the military? Many countries do.

(My personal opinion, though, is that you should have no one in the military, but if you really want an army, why not both men and women...)
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14 hours ago, Thomas Walker said:

if we met one of those women in the field, and they became convinced that they were in a bad business, would they be able to leave? If their line of work is legal, they have legal protections. S

One word, Rahab....................oh and then there is this: Matt 19:26.  Just saying.    

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I live in a Senior Citizen Complex. When I first moved here, there was a woman about my age, then, who was practicing prostitution in a different Senior Bldg, usually from her car. Her mother was a Witness and one of her sons is. At the time frame I'm talking about, she herself was attending meetings as was her father. We called on and studied with several extended family members. The "other Senior center" deteriorated greatly with the practice of prostitution and the after effects on the grounds (condoms, liquor bottles.) I take my dog out for night walks, but would not want to if  that type of night action was proliferating. Not to just be selfish, but decriminalization of sex work can not possibly have any positive influence on people or neighborhoods in general, that I can fathom.  Thanks for all who responded and helped educate me on what is going on in different places.  

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